EnglishEdit

 
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Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

co (plural cos)

  1. (slang) Clipping of company.
Alternative formsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

co (third-person singular, gender-neutral, reflexive coself)

  1. (nonstandard) they (singular). Gender-neutral subject pronoun, coordinate with gendered pronouns he and she.
    • 1983, Ingrid Komar, Living the Dream: A Documentary Study of Twin Oaks Community:
      Co consistently does less than cos share of the Community work. 4. Co absents coself from the Community for more than three weeks [...]
    • 1996, Brett Beemyn, Mickey Elianon, Queer studies: a lesbian, gay, bisexual, & transgender anthology, page 74:
      At the very least, an individual might have to use different terms to describe coself in a heterosexual context than co uses in a sexual minority context [...]
    • 2004 April 1, "Pieira dos Lobos" (username), "Fern's Story two", alt.magick.serious, Usenet:
      A youngster of my own introduction had been rejected by an object of preadolescent craving and had killed coself by leaping at the ceiling of co's quarters. Co was a rising Large Game star, her spring was powerful, our gravity flux was low - co's head struck the surface with enough force to kill on impact.
  2. (nonstandard) them (singular). Gender-neutral object pronoun, coordinate with gendered pronouns him and her.
HyponymsEdit
Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


CzechEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *čьto, from Proto-Indo-European *kʷid, *kʷis.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /t͡so/
  • (file)

PronounEdit

co

  1. what
    Co se děje?What's up?
    Co se stalo?What happened?

ConjunctionEdit

co

  1. that
    Od té doby, co jsme spolu...Since we’ve been together... (lit.) Since the time that we’ve been together...
  2. what
    Ví, co chce.He knows what he wants.

ParticleEdit

co

  1. (indeclinable) isn't it so, don't you think?
    To je pěkné, co?That’s nice, isn’t it?

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit


DalmatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin quod.

PronounEdit

co

  1. what

DumbeaEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

co

  1. water

ReferencesEdit


EsperantoEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

co (accusative singular co-on, plural co-oj, accusative plural co-ojn)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter C.

See alsoEdit


FijianEdit

NounEdit

co

  1. grass

GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From contraction of preposition con (with) + masculine definite article o (the)

ContractionEdit

co m (feminine coa, masculine plural cos, feminine plural coas)

  1. with the

GalloEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French coc.

NounEdit

co m

  1. rooster, cockerel, cock

IdoEdit

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

co (plural ci)

  1. Alternative form of ico

KurdishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Compare Persian جوی(juy) or Persian جو(ju).

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

co m

  1. ditch, trench, channel, canal, duct, fosse, aqueduct, sluice

Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Compare Persian جو(jow).

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

co f

  1. (Sorani) barley

LadinEdit

ConjunctionEdit

co

  1. than (used in comparisons)

AdverbEdit

co

  1. how (in what manner)
  2. how (in what state)

Derived termsEdit


Lower SorbianEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Slavic *čьto, from Proto-Indo-European *kʷid, *kʷis.

PronounEdit

co

  1. what (interrogative)
DeclensionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

VerbEdit

co

  1. third-person singular present of kśěś

Further readingEdit

  • co in Ernst Muka/Mucke (St. Petersburg and Prague 1911–28): Słownik dolnoserbskeje rěcy a jeje narěcow / Wörterbuch der nieder-wendischen Sprache und ihrer Dialekte. Reprinted 2008, Bautzen: Domowina-Verlag.
  • co in Manfred Starosta (1999): Dolnoserbsko-nimski słownik / Niedersorbisch-deutsches Wörterbuch. Bautzen: Domowina-Verlag.

NormanEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old French colp, coup, from Vulgar Latin *colpus, from Classical Latin colaphus (blow with the fist; cuff), from Ancient Greek κόλαφος (kólaphos, blow, slap).

NounEdit

co m (plural cos)

  1. (Jersey) blow
Alternative formsEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old French coq, coc.

NounEdit

co m (plural cos)

  1. (Jersey) cockerel
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Old French col, from Latin collum (neck).

NounEdit

co m (plural cos)

  1. (Jersey, Guernsey, Normandy, anatomy) neck
Alternative formsEdit

Old IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Indo-European *ḱóm (next to, at, with, along). Cognate with German ge- (with) (collective prefix) and gegen (toward, against), English gain-, Spanish con (with), Russian ко (ko, to).

AdverbEdit

co

  1. how?
    Co·bbia mo ḟechtas?How will my expedition be?

Usage notesEdit

Is followed by the dependent form of the verb, which is neither nasalized nor lenited.

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Irish: go
  • Scottish Gaelic: gu
  • Manx: dy

PrepositionEdit

co

  1. to, toward

DescendantsEdit

ConjunctionEdit

co (triggers eclipsis; followed by the prototonic or conjunct form of a verb; may be followed by an infixed pronoun)

  1. until
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 21c22
      ní fitir cid muntar nime conidro·foilsigsetar apstil doib
      not even heaven’s household knew it until the apostles had revealed it to them
  2. so that
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 22c10
      Is bés trá dosom aní-siu cosc inna mban i tossug et a tabairt fo chumacte a feir, armbat irlamu de ind ḟir fo chumacte Dǽi, co·mbí íarum coscitir ind ḟir et do·airbertar fo réir Dǽ.
      This, then, is a custom of his, to correct the wives at first and to bring them under the power of their husbands, so that the husbands may be the readier under God’s power, so that afterwards the husbands are corrected and bowed down in subjection to God.
    • c. 875, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 7–483, Ml. 63d7
      condan·samailter fri cech ndodcadchai
      so that we are compared to every infelicity
    Synonym: ara

Alternative formsEdit

  • ɔ (abbreviation)

PolishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *čьto, from Proto-Indo-European *kʷid, *kʷis.

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

co

  1. what

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit

PrepositionEdit

co

  1. Used together with a noun to indicate how often something happens.
    co miesiącevery month

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • co in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • co in Polish dictionaries at PWN

RomanschEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan) che
  • (Sutsilvan) ca
  • (Surmiran) tgi
  • (Puter) cu

EtymologyEdit

From Latin quam or quod.

ConjunctionEdit

co

  1. (Vallader) than

SilesianEdit

PronunciationEdit

IPA(key): [t͡sɔ]

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *čьto, from Proto-Indo-European *kʷid, *kʷis.

PronounEdit

co

  1. what

SpanishEdit

NounEdit

co m (plural cos)

  1. (Aragón, colloquial) dude, friend

Related termsEdit

PronounEdit

co

  1. Misspelling of .

VenetianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin cum. Compare Italian con

PrepositionEdit

co

  1. with, together

See alsoEdit


VietnameseEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

co

  1. to shrink (to become smaller)

Derived termsEdit

Derived terms

NounEdit

co

  1. This term needs a translation to English. Please help out and add a translation, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.