See also: Bufo, bufó, and bufò

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From translingual Bufo marinus (now Rhinella marina), the cane toad, from Latin būfo (toad).

NounEdit

bufo (plural bufos)

  1. (Hawaii, slang) toad, frog

CatalanEdit

VerbEdit

bufo

  1. first-person singular present indicative form of bufar

EsperantoEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin būfo (toad).

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)
  • IPA(key): /ˈbufo/
  • Hyphenation: bu‧fo
  • Rhymes: -ufo

NounEdit

bufo (accusative singular bufon, plural bufoj, accusative plural bufojn)

  1. toad

See alsoEdit


FriulianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin būfo (toad).

NounEdit

bufo

  1. toad

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Probably loaned from a different Italic language such as Oscan, where the word could have referred to any creeping small animal such as a hamster. The connection with Proto-Slavic *žaba (toad) is uncertain, as the initial vowel cannot reflect a common Indo-European origin.[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

būfō m (genitive būfōnis); third declension

  1. a toad

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative būfō būfōnēs
Genitive būfōnis būfōnum
Dative būfōnī būfōnibus
Accusative būfōnem būfōnēs
Ablative būfōne būfōnibus
Vocative būfō būfōnēs

DescendantsEdit

  • English: bufo
  • Italian: buffone
  • Sicilian: buffa
  • Spanish: bufón
  • Translingual: Bufo

ReferencesEdit

  • bufo in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • bufo in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • bufo in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • bufo in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  1. ^ De Vaan, Michiel (2008), “bufo”, in Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, pages 76

PortugueseEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈbu.fu/, [ˈbu.fu]

  • Hyphenation: bu‧fo

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Portuguese bufo, from Vulgar Latin *būfus (cognates include Spanish búho), itself either from Latin *būfō, from Faliscan *būfō, or more likely of onomatopoetic origin; cf. also Ancient Greek βοῦφος (boûphos). Compare to Latin būbō.

NounEdit

bufo m (plural bufos)

  1. Eurasian eagle owl (Bubo bubo)
    Synonym: corujão
  2. (Portugal, slang) police informant
    Synonyms: delator, informante

Etymology 2Edit

From Italian buffo (comical).

AdjectiveEdit

bufo m (feminine singular bufa, masculine plural bufos, feminine plural bufas, comparable)

  1. (of an actor or plot) comical or burlesque
    Synonyms: burlesco, cómico

Etymology 3Edit

From bufar (to puff).

NounEdit

bufo m (plural bufos)

  1. an instance of puffing
    Synonym: bufada

VerbEdit

bufo

  1. first-person singular (eu) present indicative of bufar

SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

bufo

  1. First-person singular (yo) present indicative form of bufar.