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GalicianEdit

 
Burla Negra ("Black Joke"), the ship of Galician pirate Benito de Soto

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Unknown. From Old Galician and Old Portuguese burla (13th century, earliest attestation of this word); probably from a pre-Roman substrate of Iberia.[1] Cognate with Portuguese burla, Spanish burla, Catalan burla.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

burla m (plural burlas)

  1. mockery, joke
    • 1460, Rui Vasques, J. A. Souto Cabo (ed.), Crónica de Santa María de Iria, page 93:
      porque a memoria da Eglleia de Yria he Ja quasy perdida, porende eu, querendo a alguũ tanto tornar a memoria dos que nõ saben nẽ creen Ja que fose obispado -ante o han por bulrra-
      because the memory of the Church of Iria is almost lost, then I, wanting to bring back this remembrance to those than don't know and no longer believe that Iria was a bishopric -they even take this for a joke-
    Synonyms: chacota, moca
  2. fraud
    • 1390, J. L. Pensado Tomé (ed.), Os Miragres de Santiago. Madrid: C.S.I.C., page 180:
      chegou a Panpelona et acaeçeu que lle morreu a moller y, et hũ ospede mao cõ que pousaua tomoulle quanto tragia por bulrra, et viose desanparado
      he arrived to Pamplona, and it happened that his wife died there, and a mean guest with whom he was staying took everything he was carrying using a fraud, and he found himself helpless
    Synonyms: engano, fraude

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • burla” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • bulrr” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • bulra” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • burla” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • burla” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.
  1. ^ Coromines, Joan; Pascual, José A. (1991–1997). Diccionario crítico etimológico castellano e hispánico. Madrid: Gredos, s.v. burla.

IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

NounEdit

burla m (genitive singular burla, nominative plural burlaí)

  1. bundle, roll, bale, plug, sheaf
  2. burly person
  3. lumpish, unsociable, person

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

  • burláil (bundle, roll together, bale, transitive verb)
  • burlaíocht ((act of) bundling; rolling about, wrestling; lumpishness)
  • burlaire (baler)
  • burlóg (small bundle)

Related termsEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
burla bhurla mburla
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Probably from Vulgar Latin *burrula[1], diminutive of Late Latin burra (nonsense, trickery, literally flock of wool), possibly through the intermediate of Spanish burla[2].

NounEdit

burla f (plural burle)

  1. trick, prank, frolic, joke

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

VerbEdit

burla

  1. third-person singular present indicative of burlare
  2. second-person singular imperative of burlare

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ burla in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana
  2. ^ burla in sapere.it – De Agostini Editore

LadinoEdit

NounEdit

burla f (Latin spelling)

  1. joke

Related termsEdit


PortugueseEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Spanish burla, of unknown origin.

NounEdit

burla f (plural burlas)

  1. fraud
  2. mockery
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

burla

  1. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present indicative of burlar
  2. second-person singular (tu, sometimes used with você) affirmative imperative of burlar

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Uncertain. The Real Academia Española suggests Vulgar Latin *burrula, from burrae, from Late Latin burra (trifles; nonsense, trickery) (compare, however, borla, which would be a doublet). Also see Italian burla.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

burla f (plural burlas)

  1. mockery, taunt, ridicule
  2. prank

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

burla

  1. Informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of burlar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present indicative form of burlar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present indicative form of burlar.

YagaraEdit

NumeralEdit

burla

  1. two

ReferencesEdit