See also: Busto

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Italian busto.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

busto (plural bustos or bustoes)

  1. (art, now rare) A bust. [from 17th c.]
    • 1719, Elias Ashmole, The Antiquities of Berkshire
      The Entrance to the Royal Apartment is through a Vestibule, supported by Pillars, with some antick Bustoes in the Niches []
    • 1753, Joshua Reynolds, in John Ingamells, John Edgcumbe (eds.), The Letters of Sir Joshua Reynolds, Yale 2000, p. 13:
      The Busto's he fix'd on were the Caracalla and the Cicero in the Gallery which I recommended as one of the best heads in the Gallery.

AnagramsEdit


GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Celtiberian boustom, from Proto-Celtic *bow- (cow) (from Proto-Indo-European *gʷṓws) and a derivative of Proto-Indo-European *steh₂- (to stand);[1][2] documented in local Latin throughout the Middle Ages.[3] Cognate with Sanskrit गोष्ठ (goṣṭha, cow-pen). Compare also Welsh bustach (bullock).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

busto m (plural bustos)

  1. (archaic) Enclosed pasture, usually in the hills, on which livestock is kept for feeding.
  2. (obsolete) A herd of cattle.
    • 1300, R. Martínez López (ed. ), General Estoria. Versión gallega del siglo XIV, page 277:
      et aly ouvo moytas gréés de ouellas et bustos de vacas
      and there were many flocks of sheep and many herds of cows

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • busto” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • busto” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • busto” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  1. ^ Julián Santano Moreno, "Celtibérico boustom, iberorromance busto, “pastizal, vacada” y bosta “boñiga”", Nouvelle Revue d’Onomastique, n° 56, 2014, p. 227-262.
  2. ^ García Trabazo, José Virgilio, “Prelatin Toponymy of Asturies: a critical review in a historical-comparative perspective”, in Lletres Asturianes[1], issue 115, 2016, retrieved 14 June 2018, pages 51-71
  3. ^ "busto" in Gallaeciae Monumenta Historica.

IdoEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

busto (plural busti)

  1. (human anatomy) bust, the head and the upper section of the torso
  2. (sculpture) bust, sculpture of the head and the upper section of the torso

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin būstum (burial mound, tomb). The semantic shift from “tomb” to “bust” happened via the meaning of “sepulchral statue”.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈbus.to/, [ˈbus̪t̪o]
  • Rhymes: -usto
  • Hyphenation: bù‧sto

NounEdit

busto m (plural busti)

  1. (obsolete) tomb, grave
    • 1372 ca., Giovanni Boccaccio, Esposizioni sopra la Commedia di Dante Alighieri (Il comento sopra la Commedia di Dante Alighieri, Tomo II, Ig. Moutier (1831), page 280):
      Chiamansi ancora i sepolcri busti, e questi son detti da' corpi combusti, [...]
      The sepulchres are still called tombs, so called for the cremated bodies, [...]
  2. (by extension, obsolete) cadaver, corpse
  3. (sculpture) bust
  4. (by extension, anatomy) torso
  5. (by extension) corset, girdle
    Synonym: guaina

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • French: buste
    • Danish: buste
    • Polish: biust

LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bustō

  1. dative/ablative singular of bustum

PortugueseEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

busto m (plural bustos)

  1. bust (sculptural portrayal of a person’s head and shoulders)
  2. bust (breasts and upper thorax of a woman)

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Italian busto, from Latin bustum (literally burned body).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈbusto/, [ˈbus.t̪o]
  • Hyphenation: bus‧to

NounEdit

busto m (plural bustos)

  1. (sculpture) bust
  2. (anatomy) bust