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EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin calva (the scalp).

NounEdit

calva (plural calvae)

  1. (anatomy) the calvaria; the dome or roof of the skull
    The excavation turned up one small femur, one broken calva, and one jawbone.

Further readingEdit

Etymology 2Edit

A shortened form of calvados.

NounEdit

calva (countable and uncountable, plural calvas)

  1. calvados, an apple brandy made in France, or a glass of this brandy
    • 2005, Fred Vargas, Have mercy on us all, page 140:
      "I believe you are already acquainted with Captain Le Guern. Please join us for a glass of calva."

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

calva m (plural calvas)

  1. calva; calvados

Further readingEdit


ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

calva

  1. Feminine singular of adjective calvo.

NounEdit

calva f (plural calve, masculine calvo)

  1. bald woman

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Italic *kalowā, from Proto-Indo-European *kl̥H-.

NounEdit

calva f (genitive calvae); first declension

  1. the bald scalp of the head
  2. skull
DeclensionEdit

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative calva calvae
Genitive calvae calvārum
Dative calvae calvīs
Accusative calvam calvās
Ablative calvā calvīs
Vocative calva calvae

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

AdjectiveEdit

calva

  1. nominative/vocative feminine singular of calvus
  2. nominative/accusative/vocative neuter plural of calvus

AdjectiveEdit

calvā

  1. ablative feminine singular of calvus

ReferencesEdit


PortugueseEdit

AdjectiveEdit

calva

  1. Feminine singular of adjective calvo.

SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈkalba/, [ˈkalβa]

AdjectiveEdit

calva

  1. Feminine singular of adjective calvo.

NounEdit

calva f (plural calvas)

  1. bald patch (area of baldness)
  2. an area on a hide or fabric from which the hair or pill has worn out
  3. clearing (area of land within a wood or forest devoid of trees)
  4. a traditional shepherds’ sport played in parts of Spain, the object of which is to knock down a partially supported horn or piece of wood (the calva) by throwing stones at it. In a modern version the stones have been substituted with metal cylinders (the marro) and horns are no more used as targets
  5. the wooden target used in the game of calva

Further readingEdit