See also: Cascade and cascadé

English edit

Etymology edit

From French cascade, from Italian cascata, from cascare (to fall), from Vulgar Latin *cāsicāre, derived from Latin cadere, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *ḱh₂d-.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /kæsˈkeɪd/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eɪd

Noun edit

cascade (plural cascades)

  1. A waterfall or series of small waterfalls.
    • 1785, William Cowper, The Garden:
      Now murm'ring soft, now roaring in cascade.
    • 1839, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, The Spirit of Poetry:
      The silver brook [] pours the white cascade.
    • 2006 July 23, Allen G. Breed, Binaj Gurubacharya, “A Climber's Highest Ambition Twice, Briton David Sharp Attempted To Conquer the World's Tallest Mountain. Then He Made His Third Try.”, in The Washington Post[1], →ISSN, →OCLC, archived from the original on August 16, 2016[2]:
      In the first week of May, Sharp began his summit push.
      He scaled the North Col, an ice cascade riddled with gaping crevasses, and established a camp at about 25,920 feet, where tents often must be pitched at 45-degree angles. But when he awoke on the third morning, it was snowing and extremely windy, and Sharp decided to abandon the attempt.
  2. (figuratively) A stream or sequence of a thing or things occurring as if falling like a cascade.
    • 2001, Richard Restak, The Secret Life of the Brain, Joseph Henry Press
      The rise in serotonin levels sets off a cascade of chemical events
    • 2019 October, “Funding for 20tph East London Line service”, in Modern Railways, page 18:
      Provision was made for this cascade of units when TfL [Transport for London] exercised an option in its order for Class 710s from Bombardier for an extra 6x5-car units and 3x4-car units: these would be used on the North London line and release '378s' for the East London line.
  3. A series of electrical (or other types of) components, the output of any one being connected to the input of the next.
    Coordinate term: daisy chain
  4. (juggling) A pattern typically performed with an odd number of props, where each prop is caught by the opposite hand.
  5. (Internet) A sequence of absurd short messages posted to a newsgroup by different authors, each one responding to the most recent message and quoting the entire sequence to that point (with ever-increasing indentation).
    • 1993, e.j.barker, “Disassociation”, in alt.slack (Usenet):
      Don't you hate cascades? I hate cascades!
    • 1999, anonymous author, “CYBERLIAR SCAVENGER HUNT 1999”, in alt.test (Usenet):
      Spark a usenet cascade of no less than 300 replies.
    • 2004, swt, “ARRR!”, in alt.religion.kibology (Usenet):
      Anyway. I didn't mean to say that everyone who posts URLs is bad and wrong and should lose their breathing privileges. Just that I was getting weary of look-at-this-link posts, sort of like some people get sick of cascades.
  6. A hairpiece for women consisting of curled locks or a bun attached to a firm base, used to create the illusion of fuller hair.
    • 1998, Teresa Nelson, Creative Wedding Decorations You Can Make, →ISBN, page 10:
      A cascade can be added to one or both sides of the band to work well with longer hair.
  7. (chemistry) A series of reactions in which the product of one becomes a reactant in the next

Derived terms edit

Translations edit

Verb edit

cascade (third-person singular simple present cascades, present participle cascading, simple past and past participle cascaded)

  1. (intransitive) To fall as a waterfall or series of small waterfalls.
    • 2020 August 26, “Network News: Major flood damage severs key Edinburgh-Glasgow rail artery”, in Rail, page 21:
      Services between Glasgow Queen Street and Edinburgh Waverley via Falkirk High are currently suspended, following a 30-metre breach of the Union Canal that occurred on August 12 after torrential rain and thunderstorms. The thousands of gallons of water that cascaded onto the railway line below washed away track, ballast and overhead line equipment, and undermined embankments along a 300-metre section of Scotland's busiest rail link.
  2. (transitive) To arrange in a stepped series like a waterfall.
    • 2001, Greg M Perry, Sams teach yourself Microsoft Windows XP in 24 hours:
      No matter how you tile or cascade the windows, each window's Minimize, Maximize, and Restore buttons work as usual.
  3. (intransitive) To occur as a causal sequence.
    • 2003, Adam Freeman, Allen Jones, Programming .NET Security:
      Child folders inherit the configuration of their parent folder, meaning that configuration settings cascade down through an application's virtual folder hierarchy.
    • 2019 October, Rhodri Clark, “TfW seeks PRM derogation for Class 37 sets”, in Modern Railways, page 87:
      Relief arrived at Cardiff Canton depot on 1 September in the shape of the first of 12 Class 170 units cascaded from Greater Anglia.
  4. (archaic, slang) To vomit.[1]

Translations edit

References edit

Anagrams edit

Dutch edit

Etymology edit

Borrowing from French cascade, from Italian cascata.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

cascade f (plural cascades or cascaden)

  1. cascade (waterfall or series of small waterfalls)

Descendants edit

  • Indonesian: kaskade

French edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Borrowed from Italian cascata, from cascare (to fall).

Noun edit

cascade f (plural cascades)

  1. cascade (waterfall)
    Synonym: chute d’eau
  2. cascade (series of event)
  3. (juggling) cascade
  4. a stunt performed for cinematic imitation or entertainment
Derived terms edit
Descendants edit

Etymology 2 edit

Verb edit

cascade

  1. inflection of cascader:
    1. first/third-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Galician edit

Verb edit

cascade

  1. second-person plural imperative of cascar

Romanian edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

cascade f

  1. inflection of cascadă:
    1. indefinite plural
    2. indefinite genitive/dative singular