See also: Kam, KAM, -kam-, kám, and käm-

Translingual edit

Symbol edit

kam

  1. (international standards) ISO 639-2 & ISO 639-3 language code for Kamba.

English edit

Etymology edit

From Welsh cam (bent, crooked, distorted), from Middle Welsh cam, from Old Welsh cam, from Proto-Brythonic *kam, from Proto-Celtic *kambos.

Cognate with Scottish Gaelic cam, Irish cam, French camus (flat-nosed) and more distantly Ancient Greek σκαμβός (skambós, crooked, bent, bow-legged). Doublet of camous.

Adjective edit

kam (not comparable)

  1. (obsolete) Crooked, awry.

References edit

Anagrams edit

Afrikaans edit

Etymology edit

From Dutch kam.

Pronunciation edit

  • (file)

Noun edit

kam (plural kamme)

  1. comb

Ainu edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

kam (Kana spelling カㇺ)

  1. flesh, meat
    unma kam hure.
    Horse meat is red.

Albanian edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

Suppletive. The aorist and participle are from Proto-Albanian *pat(i)-, from Proto-Indo-European *poti-o-, cognate with Latin potior (to have a share in, take possession of).[1] The other forms are from Proto-Albanian *kapmi, from Proto-Indo-European *kap- (to seize, to grasp), cognate with Latin capiō (take, seize), and akin to Proto-Germanic *habjaną (to have, to hold) (whence English have, German haben (to have), Gothic 𐌷𐌰𐌱𐌰𐌽 (haban, to have)). Cf. also Romanian am (I have), first-person singular indicative form of avea.

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

kam (aorist pata, participle pasur)

  1. to have
  2. (impersonal, third person) there is

Conjugation edit

Related terms edit

References edit

  1. ^ Orel, Vladimir E. (1998) “kam”, in Albanian Etymological Dictionary, Leiden, Boston, Köln: Brill, →ISBN, page 167

Angloromani edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Romani kham.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): [ˈkʰæm], [ˈcæm]

Noun edit

kam

  1. sun

References edit

  • “kam”, in Angloromani Dictionary[1], The Manchester Romani Project, 2004-2006, archived from the original on November 26, 2021, page 141

Chinese edit

Etymology 1 edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium. Particularly: “related to ? related to English camp?”)

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

kam

  1. (Cantonese, of people) cringy; weird; awkward
  2. (Cantonese, of event or action) cringy; embarrassing

Etymology 2 edit

Onomatopoeic.

Pronunciation edit


Verb edit

kam

  1. (Cantonese) to clear one's throat
Alternative forms edit

Czech edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Old Czech kamo, from Proto-Slavic *kamo.

Pronunciation edit

Adverb edit

kam

  1. where, whither (to what place)
    Antonym: odkud

Further reading edit

  • kam in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • kam in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989
  • kam in Internetová jazyková příručka

Danish edit

Etymology edit

From Old Norse kambr, from Proto-Germanic *kambaz, Norwegian, Swedish kam, English comb, German Kamm. The Germanic noun goes back to Proto-Indo-European *ǵómbʰos (tooth, peg), which is also the source of Sanskrit: जम्भः (jámbhaḥ, tooth), Ancient Greek γόμφος (gómphos, peg), Polish ząb (tooth).

Noun edit

kam c (singular definite kammen, plural indefinite kamme)

  1. comb
  2. crest (of an animal)
  3. loin, back (of a butchered animal)
  4. ridge (of a mountain)

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

References edit

Dutch edit

 
Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

Etymology edit

From Middle Dutch kamp, from Old Dutch *kamb, from Proto-West Germanic *kamb, from Proto-Germanic *kambaz.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

 
Kam

kam m (plural kammen, diminutive kammetje n)

  1. A comb, utensil to groom hair, fur etc.
  2. (anatomy etc.; by analogy) A ridge, erect shape
  3. (technical) A cam
  4. bridge (e.g. of a violin)

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

Verb edit

kam

  1. inflection of kammen:
    1. first-person singular present indicative
    2. imperative

Anagrams edit

Garo edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Assamese কাম (kam).

Noun edit

kam

  1. work

Derived terms edit

German edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

kam

  1. first/third-person singular preterite of kommen

Hausa edit

Pronunciation edit

Ideophone edit

kam

  1. firmly, tightly
  2. adamant, insistent

Alternative forms edit

Ido edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Latin quam. The initial qu was changed to k so as not to cause confusion with the word with quan.

Pronunciation edit

Adverb edit

kam

  1. than, as, to (in comparison)
    La karno esas plu fresha kam la fisho.The meat is fresher than the fish.
    Co esas tam utila kam to.This one is as useful as that one.

See also edit

Kashubian edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *kamy.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈkam/
  • Syllabification: kam

Noun edit

kam m inan

  1. stone (piece of rock that has been separated)

Declension edit

Further reading edit

  • Stefan Ramułt (1893) “kam”, in Słownik języka pomorskiego czyli kaszubskiego[2] (in Kashubian), page 66
  • Bernard Sychta (1967–1973) “kam”, in Słownik gwar kaszubskich, volume 2, page 125
  • Jan Trepczyk (1994) “kamień”, in Słownik polsko-kaszubski (in Kashubian), volumes 1–2
  • Eùgeniusz Gòłąbk (2011) “kamień”, in Słownik Polsko-Kaszubski / Słowôrz Pòlskò-Kaszëbsczi[3]
  • kam”, in Internetowi Słowôrz Kaszëbsczégò Jãzëka [Internet Dictionary of the Kashubian Language], Fundacja Kaszuby, 2022

Latvian edit

Pronoun edit

kam

  1. dative of kas

Lithuanian edit

Pronoun edit

kam

  1. dative of kas
  2. (derogatory) (interrogative) why, for what reason, what's the reason (literally: who for)
    O kam tau to reikia?
    And why do you barely need this?

Synonyms edit

Northern Kurdish edit

Etymology edit

From Armenian կամ (kam).[1][2]

Noun edit

kam ?[3]

  1. threshing sledge, threshing board
    Synonyms: cencer, patoz

References edit

  1. ^ Ačaṙean, Hračʻeay (1973) “կամն”, in Hayerēn armatakan baṙaran [Armenian Etymological Dictionary] (in Armenian), 2nd edition, a reprint of the original 1926–1935 seven-volume edition, volume II, Yerevan: University Press, page 502b
  2. ^ Cabolov, R. L. (2001) Etimologičeskij slovarʹ kurdskovo jazyka [Etymological Dictionary of the Kurdish Language] (in Russian), volume I, Moscow: Russian Academy Press Vostochnaya Literatura, page 513
  3. ^ Jaba, Auguste, Justi, Ferdinand (1879) Dictionnaire Kurde-Français [Kurdish–French Dictionary], Saint Petersburg: Imperial Academy of Sciences, page 323b

Norwegian Bokmål edit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology edit

From Old Norse kambr.

Noun edit

kam m (definite singular kammen, indefinite plural kammer, definite plural kammene)

  1. a comb

Derived terms edit

References edit

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

Etymology edit

From Old Norse kambr. Akin to English comb.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

kam m (definite singular kammen, indefinite plural kammar, definite plural kammane)

  1. a comb

Derived terms edit

References edit

Phalura edit

Etymology edit

From Urdu کم (kam), from Persian کم (kam).

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

kam (invariable, Perso-Arabic spelling کم)

  1. less
  2. inferior

References edit

  • Liljegren, Henrik, Haider, Naseem (2011) Palula Vocabulary (FLI Language and Culture Series; 7)‎[4], Islamabad, Pakistan: Forum for Language Initiatives, →ISBN

Serbo-Croatian edit

Etymology 1 edit

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *kamy.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

kȃm m (Cyrillic spelling ка̑м)

  1. (poetic) stone, rock
Declension edit

Etymology 2 edit

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *kamo.

Adverb edit

kam (Cyrillic spelling кам)

  1. (Kajkavian) where (to), in which direction, whither
    Synonym: kamo

Slovincian edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *kamy.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈkam/
  • Syllabification: kam

Noun edit

kam m inan

  1. stone (piece of rock that has been separated)

Further reading edit

Sumerian edit

Romanization edit

kam

  1. Romanization of 𒄰 (kam)

Swedish edit

Etymology edit

From Old Swedish kamber, from Old Norse kambr,[1] cognate with Danish kam[1] and Dutch kam.

That in turn derived from Proto-Germanic *kambaz, whence also Old English camb (English comb), Old High German kamb (German Kamm).[1] Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *ǵómbʰos (tooth (animate)),[1] whence also Ancient Greek γόμφος (gómphos, peg),[1] Lithuanian žam̃bas, Old Church Slavonic зѫбъ (zǫbŭ, tooth), Russian зуб (zub, tooth).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

kam c

  1. a comb for grooming hair
  2. a comb, a fleshy growth on the top of the head of some birds and reptiles
  3. a crest, summit of a hill or mountain ridge
  4. a crest, ridge of a wave
  5. a cam, a part of an engine

Declension edit

Declension of kam 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative kam kammen kammar kammarna
Genitive kams kammens kammars kammarnas

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

References edit

Anagrams edit

Talysh edit

Etymology edit

Cognate with Persian کم (kam).

Adverb edit

kam

  1. a few, a little

Tok Pisin edit

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Etymology edit

From English come.

Noun edit

kam

  1. come

White Hmong edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.
Particularly: “Not mentioned by Ratliff at all. The "accustomed to" meaning is very likely borrowed from Chinese (guàn, “to become accustomed”). The "willing, agreeable" meaning seems to be a semantic extension of the "accustomed to" meaning. Or perhaps it's from (gǎn, “dare to”)? Or maybe it's native Hmongic or from some other source?”

Verb edit

kam

  1. to be willing, agreeable
    Kuv kam thiab.I'm willing.
    Kuv tsis kam mus.I won't go.

Adverb edit

kam

  1. accustomed to
    Noj mov tsi kam.Unaccustomed to eating rice.
    Nws sau ntawv tsis kam.He isn't accustomed to writing.

Etymology 2 edit

This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.
Particularly: “Not mentioned by Ratliff at all. Perhaps borrowed from Chinese (gàn, “trunk; (colloquial) to do”) or (guān, “to concern”)?”

Noun edit

kam (classifier: tus)

  1. business, affairs
    Koj muaj kam dab tsi?What is your business? What do you want?
    kam teb chawsnational affairs; national politics

References edit

  • Heimbach, Ernest E. (1979) White Hmong — English Dictionary[6], SEAP Publications, →ISBN, page 75.

Yogad edit

Pronoun edit

kam

  1. you (plural)

Zazaki edit

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

kam

  1. who