EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

nang (plural nangs)

  1. (Australia, slang) A metal bulb filled with nitrous oxide gas, inhaled for its disassociative effects, normally intended as a propellant for whipped cream.
    • 1996 March 5, Justin O'Brien, “how long before you peak on acid?”, alt.drugs, Usenet
      I reckon the thing that brings on a trip the quickest is definitly a nang (nitrous oxide bulb) while listening to REALLY intense music
    • 1998 October 18, “noise” from hello.net.au and start.net.au, “H ?”, alt.drugs.hard, Usenet
      "helicopters" these days refers to those silly hats with propellers on top, which come with a free ounce of smack at any local K-mart. Y'know, next to the nangs (or bulbs - nitrous oxide for whipped cream).

Etymology 2Edit

Multicultural London English, from Jamaican English, from Jamaican Creole nyanga, potentially from West African languages, such as Mende nyanga (ostentation; showing off) or Hausa yanga (boastfulness).

AdjectiveEdit

nang (comparative more nang, superlative most nang)

  1. (Britain, slang, chiefly MLE) excellent; awesome; masterful; deeply satisfying.
    That was well nang!
    • 2016 December 9, Boult, Adam, quoting Quashie, Elijah, “These brilliant videos about London's takeaway chicken shops are a YouTube hit”, in The Daily Telegraph[1]:
      The wings were seriously a peng ting. The chips were nang. Burger was sick – the assembly was on point. The fillet was a serious ting – the thickness was there. Bossman did well.
SynonymsEdit

AnagramsEdit


Bau BidayuhEdit

NounEdit

nang

  1. shrimp (decapod crustacean)

ChuukeseEdit

NounEdit

nang

  1. heaven

JingphoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Sino-Tibetan *na-ŋ (thou).

PronounEdit

nang

  1. thou, you (singular)

Khumi ChinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Kuki-Chin *naŋ, from Proto-Sino-Tibetan *na-ŋ (thou).

PronounEdit

nang

  1. thou, you (singular)

LashiEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Sino-Tibetan *na-ŋ (thou).

PronounEdit

nang

  1. thou, you (singular)

MandarinEdit

RomanizationEdit

nang

  1. Nonstandard spelling of nāng.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of náng.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of nǎng.
  4. Nonstandard spelling of nàng.

Usage notesEdit

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

MizoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Kuki-Chin *naŋ, from Proto-Sino-Tibetan *na-ŋ (thou).

PronounEdit

nang

  1. thou, you (singular)

TagalogEdit

PronunciationEdit

ConjunctionEdit

nang

  1. when, at the time of (referring to past events)
    Synonym: noong
    Natutulog na ang mga bata nang dumating kami.
    The children were already sleeping when we came.
  2. for, so that, in order to
    Synonyms: para, upang
    Bilisan mo nang makahabol ka pa!
    Hurry so that you can still catch up!

ParticleEdit

nang

  1. combination of na and -ng; more; already
    Wala nang ibang hahanapin pa.
    There is no more else to find.
  2. used to connect adverbs of manner or degree to the word they modify
    Tumakbo nang mabilis ang bata.
    The child ran fast.
  3. used to connect repeated verbs
    Tumakbo nang tumakbo ang bata hanggang siya'y napagod.
    The child ran and ran until he became tired.

Usage notesEdit

  • Nang is often confused with ng. According to the Manwal sa Masinop na Pagsulat (Manual to Careful Writing) by the Commission on the Filipino Language, nang is used only in the five definitions stated above and ng is used elsewhere. Nang is also confused with na'ng, the contraction of na and ang, wherein the apostrophe is often omitted.

See alsoEdit


VietnameseEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Sino-Vietnamese word from .

NounEdit

nang

  1. follicle

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

(classifier cây) nang

  1. (archaic) areca
    Synonym: cau


YapeseEdit

VerbEdit

nang

  1. to know