certamen

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin certāmen (contest).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

certamen (uncountable)

  1. A team competition in which contestants answer questions about classical history, culture, and mythology, and the Latin language.
    • 1983 August 12, Susan Chira; Special To the New York Times, “A Roman Holiday Upstate”, in The New York Times[1], ISSN 0362-4331:
      It was the semifinal round of Certamen, Latin for contest, the Junior Classical League's answer to “It's Academic.” Two teams of four-each sat across from a judge, and pressed buzzers that lighted up a bulb showing which team responded first.
    • 1988 February 21, Tessa Melvin, “A Latin revival takes the stage at John Jay High School”, in The New York Times[2], ISSN 0362-4331:
      There's the “certamen” or contest, similar, Mrs. Nicholls said, to a television quiz show. Students compete against other schools in mythology, history and trivia. Anyone can enter - all they have to know is some Latin.

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin certāmen (contest).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

certamen m (plural certàmens)

  1. contest, competition

Further readingEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From certō (struggle, contend) +‎ -men (noun-forming suffix).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

certāmen n (genitive certāminis); third declension

  1. A contest, race, struggle, strife.
  2. A battle, engagement, combat.
    Synonyms: certatus, duellum, rixa, bellum
    • (Can we date this quote by Bible and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?) 1st Timothy, 6:12
      certa bonum certamen
      Fight the good fight
  3. An object contended for, prize.

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun (neuter, imparisyllabic non-i-stem).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative certāmen certāmina
Genitive certāminis certāminum
Dative certāminī certāminibus
Accusative certāmen certāmina
Ablative certāmine certāminibus
Vocative certāmen certāmina

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Catalan: certamen
  • English: certamen
  • Italian: certame
  • Portuguese: certame
  • Spanish: certamen

ReferencesEdit

  • certamen”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • certamen”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • certamen in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • certamen in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[3], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • gymnastic contests: certamina gymnica
    • party-strife: certamen partium
    • to engage in the fight: in certamen descendere
    • single combat: certamen singulare
    • to challenge some one to single combat: povocare aliquem ad certamen singulare

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin certāmen.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): (Spain) /θeɾˈtamen/, [θeɾˈt̪a.mẽn]
  • IPA(key): (Latin America) /seɾˈtamen/, [seɾˈt̪a.mẽn]

NounEdit

certamen m (plural certámenes)

  1. contest, competition
    certamen literarioliterary contest
    • 2021 July 15, Raquel Piñeiro, “Amparo Muñoz, el infierno televisado”, in El País[4]:
      Jane Fonda y Angela Davis recibieron la llamada del novio de Miss Universo, que les contó que la joven reina de belleza estaba siendo explotada por la organización del certamen y vivía en espantosas condiciones.
      Jane Fonda and Angela Davis received a phone call from the boyfriend of Miss Universe, who told them that the young beauty queen was being exploited by the organization of the pageant and lived in horrible conditions.
  2. challenge

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit