English

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Etymology

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16th century, borrowed from Middle French combat, deverbal from Old French combatre, from Vulgar Latin *combattere, from Latin com- (with) + battuere (to beat, strike).

Pronunciation

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  • Noun:
    • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈkɒmˌbæt/, (obsolete) /ˈkʌmˌbæt/[1]
    • (US) IPA(key): /ˈkɑmˌbæt/
    • Audio (US):(file)
  • Verb:
  • Rhymes: -æt

Noun

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combat (countable and uncountable, plural combats)

  1. A battle, a fight (often one in which weapons are used).
    • 1907 August, Robert W[illiam] Chambers, chapter VIII, in The Younger Set, New York, N.Y.: D. Appleton & Company, →OCLC:
      "My tastes," he said, still smiling, "incline me to the garishly sunlit side of this planet." And, to tease her and arouse her to combat: "I prefer a farandole to a nocturne; I'd rather have a painting than an etching; Mr. Whistler bores me with his monochromatic mud; I don't like dull colours, dull sounds, dull intellects; []."
    • 1950 September 1, Harry S. Truman, 0:56 from the start, in MP72-73 Korea and World Peace: President Truman Reports to the People[2], Harry S. Truman Presidential Library and Museum, National Archives Identifier: 595162:
      In less than eight weeks, five divisions of United States troops have moved into combat, some of them from bases more than 6,000 miles away. More men are on the way. Fighting in difficult country under every kind of hardship, American troops have held back overwhelming numbers of the communist invaders.
    • 2012 March, William E. Carter, Merri Sue Carter, “The British Longitude Act Reconsidered”, in American Scientist, volume 100, number 2, page 87:
      Conditions were horrendous aboard most British naval vessels at the time. Scurvy and other diseases ran rampant, killing more seamen each year than all other causes combined, including combat.
  2. a struggle for victory

Derived terms

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Translations

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Verb

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combat (third-person singular simple present combats, present participle combatting or combating, simple past and past participle combatted or combated)

  1. (transitive) To fight; to struggle against.
    It has proven very difficult to combat drug addiction.
  2. (intransitive) To fight (with); to struggle for victory (against).
    • 1671, John Milton, Samson Agonistes:
      To combat with a blind man I disdain.

Translations

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References

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  1. 1.0 1.1 Jespersen, Otto (1909) A Modern English Grammar on Historical Principles (Sammlung germanischer Elementar- und Handbücher; 9)‎[1], volumes I: Sounds and Spellings, London: George Allen & Unwin, published 1961, § 3.442, page 85.

Anagrams

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Catalan

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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Deverbal from combatre. First attested in 1490.[1]

Noun

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combat m (plural combats)

  1. combat

Etymology 2

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Verb

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combat

  1. inflection of combatre:
    1. third-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person singular imperative

References

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  1. ^ combat”, in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana, 2024

Further reading

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French

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Etymology

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From combattre.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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combat m (plural combats)

  1. combat (hostile interaction)
  2. (figuratively) combat (contest; competition)
  3. (in the plural) battle; military combat

Derived terms

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Verb

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combat

  1. third-person singular present indicative of combattre

Further reading

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Norman

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Etymology

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(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

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combat m (plural combats)

  1. (Jersey) combat

Romanian

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Pronunciation

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Verb

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combat

  1. inflection of combate:
    1. first-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. third-person plural present indicative