See also: Chay, cháy, chày, chấy, chảy, and chạy

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

chay (plural chays)

  1. (archaic, colloquial) A chaise (horse-drawn carriage).

Etymology 2Edit

From Pitman jay, which it is related to graphically, and the sound it represents.

NounEdit

chay (plural chays)

  1. The letter ⟨/⟩, which stands for the ch sound /tʃ/, in Pitman shorthand.

AnagramsEdit


Ch'orti'Edit

NounEdit

chay

  1. fish

ReferencesEdit

  • Hull, Kerry (2005) An Abbreviated Dictionary of Ch'orti' Maya[1]

LadinoEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Persian چای(čây).

NounEdit

chay m (Latin spelling, Hebrew spelling גאיי‎)

  1. tea

ManxEdit

NounEdit

chay f

  1. Lenited form of kay.

MutationEdit

Manx mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
kay chay gay
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

QuechuaEdit

DeterminerEdit

chay

  1. (medial) that

See alsoEdit


VietnameseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Non-Sino-Vietnamese reading of Chinese (vegetarian, SV: trai).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

chay (𣙮)

  1. This term needs a translation to English. Please help out and add a translation, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.

AdjectiveEdit

chay (𡄡)

  1. vegan
    ăn chay
    to practise veganism; to go vegan
    Bạn có biết nấu chả giò chay không?
    Do you know how to cook vegan spring rolls?

Usage notesEdit

  • Chay could be broadly translated as either "vegan" or "vegetarian" when it comes to food and cuisine, although chay people (some of whom are actual vegan Buddhists) do tend to consciously avoid fat-based cooking oil and nước mắm (fish sauce), so the term corresponds better to "vegan".

AdverbEdit

chay (𡄡)

  1. (colloquial) in an ordinary, even lackluster, way; without special aids or equipment