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EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

 
Eurasian jay
 
American jay

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English jay, from Old French jai ("jay"; Modern French geai), from Old French jai (gay, merry), so named due to its plumage, from Old Frankish *gāhi (quick, impetuous), from Proto-Germanic *ganhuz, *ganhwaz (sudden), cognate with Dutch gaai (jay). More at gay.

NounEdit

jay (plural jays)

  1. Any one of the numerous species of birds belonging to several genera within the family Corvidae, including Garrulus, Cyanocitta, Aphelocoma, Perisoreus, Cyanocorax, Gymnorhinus, Cyanolyca, Ptilostomus, and Calocitta, allied to the crows, but smaller, more graceful in form, often handsomely colored, usually having a crest, and often noisy.
  2. Other birds of similar appearance and behavior.
  3. (archaic) A dull or ignorant person. It survives today in the term jaywalking.
    • 1900, Harry B. Norris, Burlington Bertie (song)
      Burlington Bertie's the latest young jay
      He rents a swell flat somewhere Kensington way
      He spends the good oof that his pater has made
      Along with the Brandy and Soda Brigade.
  4. (obsolete) Promiscuous woman; prostitute.
SynonymsEdit
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Etymology 2Edit

Respelling of the letter jy, by analogy with the following letter kay.

NounEdit

jay (plural jays)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter J/j.
  2. (slang) A marijuana cigarette; a joint.
    • 2009, Caitlin Moran, The Times, 23 Mar 2009:
      Although sympathetic, my main reaction was to think: “Some people can handle it, and some people can’t,” and then smugly light up a big fat jay.
Derived termsEdit
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KaqchikelEdit

NounEdit

jay

  1. home

Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French jai, from Frankish *gāhi or Late Latin gaius. Doublet of gay.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

jay (plural jayes)

  1. jay (bird)

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit