See also: clôt

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English clot, clotte, from Old English clott, from Proto-West Germanic *klott (lump). Cognate with German Klotz (block).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /klɒt/
    • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɒt

NounEdit

clot (plural clots)

  1. A thrombus, solidified mass of blood.
  2. A solidified mass of any liquid.
    • 1631, [Francis Bacon], “(please specify |century=I to X)”, in Sylua Syluarum: Or A Naturall Historie. In Ten Centuries. [], 3rd edition, London: [] VVilliam Rawley; [p]rinted by J[ohn] H[aviland] for William Lee [], OCLC 1044372886:
      Doth bake the egg into clots as if it began to poach.
  3. A silly person.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

clot (third-person singular simple present clots, present participle clotting, simple past and past participle clotted)

  1. (intransitive) To form a clot or mass.
  2. (transitive) To cause to clot or form into a mass.

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Of uncertain, perhaps Indo-European but pre-Roman origin.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

clot m (plural clots)

  1. pit, hole
  2. dip (a lower section of a road or geological feature)

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English clot, clott, from Proto-West Germanic *klott; compare clod.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

clot (plural clottes)

  1. A clod; a ball of earth or clay.
  2. The ground; the earth's surface.
  3. (figuratively) The body.
  4. (rare) A chunk of turf or soil.

DescendantsEdit

  • English: clot

ReferencesEdit