See also: Coger

EnglishEdit

NounEdit

coger (plural cogers)

  1. Obsolete form of codger.

ReferencesEdit

  • 1873, John Camden Hotten, The Slang Dictionary

AnagramsEdit


SpanishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • (have sex): cojer (Mexico, Venezuela, Argentina)

EtymologyEdit

From Latin colligere, present active infinitive of colligō (to collect, to gather). Cognate with Portuguese colher, Sicilian cògghiri, and also with English cull, coil, college, and collect. Compare also the borrowed doublet colegir. Not related to Latin cogere.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /koˈxeɾ/, [koˈxeɾ]
  • (file)

VerbEdit

coger (first-person singular present cojo, first-person singular preterite cogí, past participle cogido)

  1. (Colombia, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Peru, Philippines, Puerto Rico, Spain) to take, catch, hold, to get, to seize
    Synonyms: agarrarse, tomar, prender, asir
  2. to pick, harvest
    Synonyms: cosechar, recolectar
  3. to fish
    Synonyms: pescar, atrapar
  4. to seize, arrest; to overtake
    Synonyms: atrapar, aprehender, capturar
  5. to get (a joke)
  6. (Spain) to imitate, learn
  7. (vulgar, Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Mexico, Paraguay, Uruguay, Venezuela, Central America) to have sex, to fuck, to bang
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:joder
  8. (Spain) to choose (a direction, route, when driving or walking)
  9. (Spain) to turn to (when driving or walking)
    Synonym: dar vuelta
  10. (Spain) to board (means of transportation)
    Tengo que coger el tren.I have a train to catch.

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit

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Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit