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See also: Arrest

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EnglishEdit

 
A suspect being arrested, as in most countries handcuffed with the arms on the back

EtymologyEdit

From Old French arester (to stay, stop), from Vulgar Latin *arrestare, from Latin ad- (to) + restare (to stop, remain behind, stay back), from re- (back) + stare (to stand), from Proto-Indo-European *steh₂- (to stand). Compare French arrêter (to stop).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /əˈɹɛst/
  • Hyphenation: ar‧rest
  • Rhymes: -ɛst
  • (file)

NounEdit

arrest (countable and uncountable, plural arrests)

  1. A check, stop, an act or instance of arresting something.
  2. The condition of being stopped, standstill.
  3. (law) The process of arresting a criminal, suspect etc.
  4. A confinement, detention, as after an arrest.
  5. A device to physically arrest motion.
  6. (nautical) The judicial detention of a ship to secure a financial claim against its operators.
  7. (obsolete) Any seizure by power, physical or otherwise.
    • Jeremy Taylor
      The sad stories of fire from heaven, the burning of his sheep, etc., [] were sad arrests to his troubled spirit.
  8. (farriery) A scurfiness of the back part of the hind leg of a horse.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of White to this entry?)

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

VerbEdit

arrest (third-person singular simple present arrests, present participle arresting, simple past and past participle arrested)

  1. (obsolete, transitive) To stop the motion of (a person or animal). [14th-19th c.]
    • Philips
      Nor could her virtues the relentless hand / Of Death arrest.
    • 1952, Doris Lessing, Martha Quest, Panther 1974, p. 86:
      Mr. Van Rensberg broke the spell by arresting Martha as she trailed past him on Billy's arm, by pointing his pipestem at her and saying, ‘Hey, Matty, come here a minute.’
  2. (obsolete, intransitive) To stay, remain. [14th-16th c.]
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Spenser to this entry?)
  3. (transitive) To stop or slow (a process, course etc.). [from 14th c.]
    • 1994, Nelson Mandela, Long Walk to Freedom, Abacus 2010, p. 707:
      To try to arrest the spiral of violence, I contacted Chief Buthelezi to arrange a meeting.
    • 1997: Chris Horrocks, Introducing Foucault, page 69 (Totem Books, Icon Books; →ISBN
      Knowledge replaced universal resemblance with finite differences. History was arrested and turned into tables …Western reason had entered the age of judgement.
  4. (transitive) To seize (someone) with the authority of the law; to take into legal custody. [from 14th c.]
    The police have arrested a suspect in the murder inquiry.
    • Shakespeare
      I arrest thee of high treason.
  5. (transitive) To catch the attention of. [from 19th c.]
    • 1919: P. G. Wodehouse, My Man Jeeves:
      There is something about this picture—something bold and vigorous, which arrests the attention. I feel sure it would be highly popular.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

NounEdit

arrest m (plural arrests or arrestos)

  1. arrest

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch arrest, from Old French arest.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

arrest n (plural arresten, diminutive arrestje n)

  1. detention, confinement, especially after being arrested
  2. (law) sentence passed by a higher court

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French arester

NounEdit

arrest m (definite singular arresten, indefinite plural arrester, definite plural arrestene)

  1. arrest, custody, detention

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French arester

NounEdit

arrest m (definite singular arresten, indefinite plural arrestar, definite plural arrestane)

  1. arrest, custody, detention

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit