compatriot

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French compatriote, from Latin cum (with) + patria (homeland). Displaced native Old English ġelanda.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /kəmˈpeɪtɹi.ət/, /kəmˈpætɹi.ət/

NounEdit

compatriot (plural compatriots)

  1. Somebody from one's own country.
    • 1858, John Gorham Palfrey, History of New England
      the distrust with which they felt themselves to be regarded by their compatriots in America
    • 2011 October 20, Jamie Lillywhite, “Tottenham 1 - 0 Rubin Kazan”, in BBC Sport[1]:
      However Russian Pavlyuchenko stunned his compatriots with an unstoppable 25-yard drive into the top corner.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

compatriot (comparative more compatriot, superlative most compatriot)

  1. Of the same country; having a common sentiment of patriotism.
    • 1736, [James] Thomson, The Prospect: Being the Fifth Part of Liberty. A Poem, London: [] A[ndrew] Millar, [], OCLC 10833525, lines 71–72, page 8:
      She [Britain] rears to Freedom an undaunted Race: / Compatriot zealous, hoſpitable, kind, []

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for compatriot in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913)


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French compatriote, Latin compatriota.

NounEdit

compatriot m (plural compatrioți, feminine equivalent compatrioată)

  1. compatriot
    Synonym: simpatriot

DeclensionEdit

Further readingEdit