See also: Crone

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French carogne, French charogne (carrion). See carrion and crony.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

crone (plural crones)

  1. (archaic) An old woman.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:old woman
  2. An archetypal figure, a Wise Woman.
  3. An ugly, evil-looking, or frightening old woman; a hag.
    • 2005, J. M. Coetzee, “Six”, in Slow Man, New York: Viking, →ISBN, page 36:
      With black unseeing eyes the old woman, the crone, stares at him and through him. Over and over she mutters a word that he cannot quite catch, something like Toomderoom.
  4. (obsolete) An old ewe.
    • 1573, Tusser Five Hundred Good Points of Husbandry
      In traveling homeward, buy forty good crones, and fat up the bodies of those seely bones
  5. (obsolete) An old man, especially one who talks and acts like an old woman.

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


Middle DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Dutch corōna, from Latin corōna. Doublet of crune.

NounEdit

crône f

  1. crown, wreath

InflectionEdit

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Dutch: kroon
    • Afrikaans: kroon
    • Indonesian: kerun
    • Negerhollands: kroon
  • Limburgish: kroean

Further readingEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

crone

  1. Alternative form of crane (crane)