See also: håg, hág, Hag, and Hag.

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /hæɡ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -æɡ

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English hagge, hegge (demon, old woman), shortening of Old English hægtesse, hægtes (harpy, witch), from Proto-Germanic *hagatusjǭ (compare Saterland Frisian Häkse (witch), Dutch heks, German Hexe (witch)), compounds of (1) *hagaz (able, skilled) (compare Old Norse hagr (handy, skillful), Middle High German behac (pleasurable)), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱak- (compare Sanskrit शक्नोति (śaknóti, he can)),[1] and (2) *tusjǭ (witch) (compare dialectal Norwegian tysja (fairy, she-elf)).[2]

NounEdit

hag (plural hags)

  1. A witch, sorceress, or enchantress; a wizard.
    • 1565, Arthur Golding (tr.), The Fyrst Fower Bookes of P. Ouidius Nasos worke intitled Metamorphosis[1], London: William Seres, The Fovrthe Booke:
      And that olde hag that with a staffe his staggering lymbes dooth stay
    • 1851 November 14, Herman Melville, chapter 3, in Moby-Dick; or, The Whale, 1st American edition, New York, N.Y.: Harper & Brothers; London: Richard Bentley, OCLC 57395299:
      Such unaccountable masses of shades and shadows, that at first you almost thought some ambitious young artist, in the time of the New England hags, had endeavored to delineate chaos bewitched.
  2. (derogatory) An ugly old woman.
  3. A fury; a she-monster.
    • 1646, Richard Crashaw, Steps to the Temple, “Sospetto D' Herode”, stanza 37:
      Fourth of the cursed knot of hags is she / Or rather all the other three in one; / Hell's shop of slaughter she does oversee, / And still assist the execution
  4. A hagfish; one of various eel-like fish of the family Myxinidae, allied to the lamprey, with a suctorial mouth, labial appendages, and a single pair of gill openings.
  5. A hagdon or shearwater; one of various sea birds of the genus Puffinus.
  6. (obsolete) An appearance of light and fire on a horse's mane or a man's hair.
    • 1656, Thomas White, Peripateticall Institutions[2], page 149:
      Flamma lambentes (or those we call Haggs) are made of Sweat or some other Vapour issuing out of the Head; a not-unusuall sight amongst us when we ride by night in the Summer time: They are extinguisht, like flames, by shaking the Horse Mains
  7. The fruit of the hagberry, Prunus padus.
  8. (slang) sleep paralysis
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Scots hag (to cut), from Old Norse hǫgg (cut, gap, breach), derivative of hǫggva (to hack, hew); compare English hew.

NounEdit

hag (plural hags)

  1. A small wood, or part of a wood or copse, which is marked off or enclosed for felling, or which has been felled.
    • 1845, Edward Fairfax (tr.), Godfrey of Bulloigne; or, The Recovery of Jerusalem: Done into English Heroical Verse[3], page 168:
      This said, he led me over hoults and hags; / Through thorns and bushes scant my legs I drew
  2. A quagmire; mossy ground where peat or turf has been cut.
    • 1662, Sir William Dugdale, The History of Imbanking and Drayning of Divers Fenns and Marshes[4], page 292:
      And they likewise ordained [] that all the warp should be thrown into the Common wayes, to fill up haggs and lakes, where need was, upon a great penalty, where it should ly neer the Common rode.

Etymology 3Edit

From Proto-Germanic *hag(g)ōnan (compare obsolete Dutch hagen (to torment, agonize), Norwegian haga (to tire, weaken)).[3]

VerbEdit

hag (third-person singular simple present hags, present participle hagging, simple past and past participle hagged)

  1. (transitive) To harass; to weary with vexation.
    • 1692, Roger L'Estrange (tr.), Fables of Aesop and Other Eminent Mythologists: with Morals and Reflexions[5], page 149:
      How are Superstitious Men Hagg'd Out of their Wits and Senses, with the Fancy of Omens, Forebodings, Old Wives Tales, and Visions

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Vladimir Orel, A Handbook of Germanic Etymology, s.v. “*xaʒaz” (Leiden: Brill, 2003), 149-50.
  2. ^ E. C. Polomé, “Althochdeutsch hag(a)zussa ‘Hexe’: Versuch einer neuen Etymologie”, in: R. Bergmann, ed., Althochdeutsch 2 (Wörter und Namen. Forschungsgeschichte) (1987), 1107-12.
  3. ^ Guus Kroonen, Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Germanic, s.v. “*hagla-” (Leiden: Brill, 2013), 199.

External linksEdit

AnagramsEdit


BretonEdit

ConjunctionEdit

hag

  1. and

SynonymsEdit

  • (before consonants or /j/) ha

CornishEdit

ConjunctionEdit

hag

  1. and

SynonymsEdit

  • (before consonants) ha

DanishEdit

VerbEdit

hag

  1. imperative of hage

ScotsEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English haggen (to hack, chop, cut), from Old Norse hǫggva (to hew). Compare English hag, above. Noun attested from the 14th century in Older Scots, with the verb from c. 1400.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

hag (plural hags)

  1. a notch; a pit or break
  2. a stroke of an axe or similar instrument
  3. the felling of timber; the quantity of wood felled
  4. a quagmire from which peat or turf is cut

VerbEdit

hag (third-person singular present hags, present participle haggin, past hagg'd, past participle haggit)

  1. to chop (wood); to hack; to dig out (coal etc.)
  2. (figuratively) to make a hash of (something)
    • 1829, C.N. [John Wilson], “Noctes Ambrosianæ”, in Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine[6], page 789:
      [] and the rawzor haggit like a saw—Trumbull o’ Selkirk makes good rawzors, but the weans are unco fond of playing wi’ mine, puir things—Od keep us!
      when the razor is hacked like a saw-tooth—Trumbull from Selkirk makes good razors, but the children are uncommonly fond of playing with mine, the poor things—then God help us!
  3. to cut down trees and prepare timber

Etymology 2Edit

Unknown. Perhaps from Etymology 1 above, “to hack”, thus “castrate”. Compare hogg (a young sheep). Attested from the 19th century.

NounEdit

hag (plural hags)

  1. an ox
  2. a cattleman, one who raises cattle or oxen
    Synonym: hagman

Etymology 3Edit

From Icelandic hagga (to budge; to put out of place). Attested from the 20th century.

VerbEdit

hag (third-person singular present hags, present participle haggin, past hagg'd, past participle haggit)

  1. to hinder; to impede

ReferencesEdit


WestrobothnianEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hag n (definite hagjä)

  1. simple fence or enclosure made of sticks, twigs or bushes
  2. (hunting) such a construction used for hunting, with openings with snares and traps where birds and hares are caught

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit