See also: Crane, crâne, and crâné

English edit

 
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A crane (bird).
 
A crane (mechanical).

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /kɹeɪn/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eɪn

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle English crane, from Old English cran (crane), from Proto-West Germanic *kran, from Proto-Germanic *kranô (crane), from Proto-Indo-European *gerh₂- (to cry hoarsely).

Cognate with Scots cran (crane), Dutch kraan (crane), German Kran (crane). The mechanical devices are named from their likeness to the bird.

Noun edit

crane (plural cranes)

  1. Any bird of the family Gruidae, large birds with long legs and a long neck which is extended during flight.
  2. (US, dialect) Ardea herodias, the great blue heron.
  3. A mechanical lifting machine or device, often used for lifting heavy loads for industrial or construction purposes.
    • 2000, Bob Foster, Birdum or Bust!, Henley Beach, SA: Seaview Press, page 111:
      Large cranes were virtually non-existent in the areas I worked with this truck, so we jacked everything on and off[.]
  4. An iron arm with horizontal motion, attached to the side or back of a fireplace for supporting kettles etc. over the fire.
  5. A siphon, or bent pipe, for drawing liquors out of a cask.
  6. (nautical) A forked post or projecting bracket to support spars, etc.; generally used in pairs.
Hyponyms edit
Derived terms edit

(Lifting devices):

Birds
other terms (unsorted)
Related terms edit
Descendants edit
Translations edit
See also edit

Verb edit

crane (third-person singular simple present cranes, present participle craning, simple past and past participle craned)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To extend (one's neck).
    • 1879, George Eliot, Impressions of Theophrastus Such:
      and my bachelor's hearth is imbedded where by much craning of head and neck I can catch sight of a sycamore in the Square garden,
    • 1948 November and December, “By Broad Gauge to Cornwall”, in Railway Magazine, page 357:
      Didcot had one definite pleasure. We knew that little boys would be going up and down the platform singing out, "Banbury cakes! Banbury cakes!" And mother would crane out and buy some, just to encourage the crew.
    • 2008, Rivers Cuomo (lyrics and music), “Troublemaker”, in Weezer (Red Album), performed by Weezer:
      I'm gonna be a star and people will crane necks
      To get a glimpse of me and see if I am having sex
  2. (transitive) To raise or lower with, or as if with, a crane.
    • 1693, William Bates, Sermons preach'd on Several Occasions:
      What engines, what instruments are used in craning up a soul, sunk below the centre, to the highest heavens.
    • 1619, Philip Massinger, Nathan Field, The Fatal Dowry:
      an upstart craned up to the height he has
    • 2024 January 24, Peter Plisner, “Rising to the University challenge”, in RAIL, number 1001, pages 60-61:
      Several overnight weekend possessions were required to crane in new bridges and various other parts of the buildings which were manufactured offsite.
  3. (intransitive) To pull up before a jump.
Translations edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Middle English crane, cranee, from Old French cran, from Medieval Latin crānium.

Noun edit

crane (plural cranes)

  1. (obsolete) The cranium.

Etymology 3 edit

Noun edit

crane (plural cranes)

  1. Alternative form of cran (measure of herrings)

Anagrams edit

Middle English edit

Etymology 1 edit

Inherited from Old English cran, *crana.

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈkraːn(ə)/, /kran/

Noun edit

crane (plural cranes)

  1. crane (bird)
  2. crane (machine)
Derived terms edit
Descendants edit
References edit

Etymology 2 edit

Borrowed from Old French cran, from Medieval Latin crānium.

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

crane

  1. cranium
Descendants edit
  • English: crane (obsolete)
References edit