See also: Disciple

English edit

Etymology edit

From Middle English disciple, discipul, from Old English discipul (disciple, scholar), from Latin discipulus (pupil, learner). Later influenced or superseded in Middle English by Old French deciple.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /dɪˈsaɪ.pəl/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -aɪpəl
  • Hyphenation: dis‧ci‧ple

Noun edit

disciple (plural disciples)

  1. A person who learns from another, especially one who then teaches others.
  2. An active follower or adherent of someone, or some philosophy etc.
  3. (Ireland) A wretched, miserable-looking man.

Synonyms edit

Related terms edit

Translations edit

See also edit

Verb edit

disciple (third-person singular simple present disciples, present participle discipling, simple past and past participle discipled)

  1. (religion, transitive) To convert (a person) into a disciple.
  2. (religion, transitive) To train, educate, teach.
    1. (Christianity, certain denominations) To routinely counsel (one's peer or junior) one-on-one in their discipleship of Christ, as a fellow affirmed disciple.

Further reading edit

French edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Old French deciple, borrowed from Latin discipulus.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

disciple m (plural disciples)

  1. disciple

Further reading edit