See also: Peer and Per

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English piren (to peer), from or related to Saterland Frisian pierje (to look), Dutch Low Saxon piren (to look), West Flemish pieren (to look with narrowed eyes, squint at), Dutch pieren (to look closely at, examine). Or, possibly from a shortening of appear.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

peer (third-person singular simple present peers, present participle peering, simple past and past participle peered)

  1. (intransitive) To look with difficulty, or as if searching for something.
  2. (intransitive, obsolete) To come in sight; to appear.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

peer (plural peers)

  1. A look; a glance.
    • 1970, William Crookes, T. A. Malone, George Shadbolt, The British journal of photography (volume 117, page 58)
      Blessed are those organisers who provide one-and-all with a name tag, for then the participants will chat together. A quick peer at your neighbour's lapel is much the simplest way to become introduced []

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English pere, per, from Anglo-Norman peir, Old French per, from Latin pār. Doublet of pair and par

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

peer (plural peers)

  1. Somebody who is, or something that is, at a level or of a value equal (to that of something else).
  2. Someone who is approximately the same age (as someone else).
  3. A noble with a title, i.e., a peerage, and in times past, with certain rights and privileges not enjoyed by commoners.
    a peer of the realm
  4. A comrade; a companion; an associate.
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

VerbEdit

peer (third-person singular simple present peers, present participle peering, simple past and past participle peered)

  1. To make equal in rank.
    • 1670, Peter Heylyn, Aerius Redivivus:
      Being now Peered with the Lord Chancellor, and the Earl of Essex.
  2. (Internet) To carry communications traffic terminating on one's own network on an equivalency basis to and from another network, usually without charge or payment. Contrast with transit where one pays another network provider to carry one's traffic.
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

pee +‎ -er

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

peer (plural peers)

  1. (informal) Someone who pees, someone who urinates.
    • 1999 August 22, “Re: Swimming after eating”, in alt.folklore.urban, Usenet[3]:
      As was the caveat about peeing in a pool. Of course, peeing in a pool wasn't dangerous to the person ... If you peed in a pool, and you were carrying the polio virus, presumably *other* people were put at risk, not the peer (pee-er?).
    • 2000 August 29, “Re: 32 month old urinating in his room! HELP!”, in alt.parenting.solutions, Usenet[4]:
      SOunds[sic] like you've already broken him quite well, if he's peeing when disciplined. Pretty sad. He's not a dog, not that treating a dog like this is any better either. You've turned your child into a submissive peer.
    • 2003 October 11, “Re: do female's "mark" their territory?”, in rec.pets.dogs.behavior, Usenet[5]:
      Submissive peeing, on the other hand, IS related to anxiety. But submissive peeing is not marking. A submissive peer is generally a very submissive dog.

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch peer, from Middle Dutch pēre, from Vulgar Latin *pira, from Latin pirum.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

peer (plural pere)

  1. pear

DutchEdit

 
Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch pēre, from Vulgar Latin *pira, from Latin pirum.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

peer f (plural peren, diminutive peertje n)

  1. A pear, a fruit of the pear tree.
  2. A light bulb.

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Afrikaans: peer
  • Jersey Dutch: pêr
  • Saramaccan: péíli (from the diminutive form)

NounEdit

peer m (plural peren, diminutive peertje n)

  1. A pear tree, Pyrus communis.
    • 1911, H. Heukels, Kennis Der Natuur A. Leerboek der dierkunde, plantkunde en natuurkunde voor a.s. onderwijzers, vol. II "dierkunde", page 77.
      Bij den peer zijn de bloemen wit en iets kleiner dan bij den appel.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

peer

  1. Alternative form of pere (peer)

AdjectiveEdit

peer

  1. Alternative form of pere (equal)

ScotsEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English pere (pear), from Old English pere, peru, from Vulgar Latin *pira, from Latin pirum.

NounEdit

peer (plural peers)

  1. pear (fruit)
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English piren (to peer).

VerbEdit

peer (third-person singular simple present peers, present participle peerin, simple past peert, past participle peert)

  1. To peer.

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Inherited from Latin pēdere, pēdō, from Proto-Italic *pezdō from Proto-Indo-European *pesd-.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /peˈeɾ/, [peˈeɾ]

VerbEdit

peer (first-person singular present peo, first-person singular preterite peí, past participle peído)

  1. to break wind, to fart
  2. (reflexive) to break wind; fart

ConjugationEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit