See also: Dorn and dòrn

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Compare German Dorn (thorn).

NounEdit

dorn (plural dorns)

  1. A British ray; the thornback.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for dorn in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

AnagramsEdit


BretonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Celtic *durnos (compare Welsh dwrn (fist), Irish dorn).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dorn m (plural dornioù, dual daouarn)

  1. hand

CornishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Celtic *durnos (compare Welsh dwrn (fist), Irish dorn).

NounEdit

dorn m (dual dewdhorn or diwla, plural dornow)

  1. hand
  2. fist
  3. handle

MutationEdit


IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish dorn, from Proto-Celtic *durnos (compare Welsh dwrn).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dorn m (genitive singular doirn, nominative plural doirne)

  1. fist

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

  • dornáil (to box, fist; boxing, fisting)

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
dorn dhorn ndorn
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Middle DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Dutch thorn, from Proto-Germanic *þurnuz.

NounEdit

dorn m

  1. thorn
  2. thornbush

InflectionEdit

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Alternative formsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Dutch: doren, doorn

Further readingEdit

  • dorn”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000

Verwijs, E.; Verdam, J. (1885–1929), “dorn”, in Middelniederlandsch Woordenboek, The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, →ISBN