English edit

Pronunciation edit

  • (unstressed) IPA(key): /fə(ɹ)/
    • (file)
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ə(ɹ)

Preposition edit

fer

  1. (dialectal, especially British) Pronunciation spelling of for.

Derived terms edit

See also edit

terms containing the word "fer", but etymologically unrelated

References edit

Anagrams edit

Aragonese edit

Etymology edit

From Latin facere.

Verb edit

fer

  1. to do

Conjugation edit

Catalan edit

Etymology 1 edit

Inherited from Latin facere.

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

fer (first-person singular present faig, first-person singular preterite fiu, past participle fet)

  1. to make, produce
    Fer vinagre.To make vinegar.
    Aquesta terra fa molt bon blat.This land produces very good wheat.
    Quatre i quatre fan vuit.Four and four make eight.
    Fer d'un enemic un aliat.To turn an enemy into an ally.
    Fer olor de roses.To smell of rose.
    Fer pudor de porcs.To stink of pig.
    (idiomatic) Fer bondatto behave, to comply with one's duty (an idiom, literally to make goodness)
    (idiomatic) Fer figato fail to achieve an expected result (an idiom, literally to make fig)
  2. to make up
    Els jubilats fan un quart de la població.Retired people make up a quarter of the population.
  3. to do, to cause to be done
  4. to make do
  5. to give
    El primer marit li va fer dos fills.Her first husband gave her two sons.
    Feu-me mig quilo de formatge.Give me half a kilo of cheese.
    Fes-me un petó!Kiss me!
  6. to lay
    La canària ha fet un ou.The canary has laid an egg.
  7. to cause
  8. (auxiliary) to make (someone) (do something), that is auxiliary verb to form the causative together with an infinitive
    em van fer tornar a buscar el rebutthey made me go back to get the receipt
    l'has feta ploraryou made her cry
  9. to go
  10. (impersonal, of weather) to be
    Fa fred!It is cold!
    Fa calor!It is hot!
    Fa vent!It is windy!
  11. to play
  12. to measure
Conjugation edit

Balearic uses fais for the second person plural form in the present indicative instead of feu.

Derived terms edit
Related terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

Inherited from Latin ferus (compare Occitan fèr, French fier, Spanish fiero), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰwer-.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

fer (feminine fera, masculine plural fers, feminine plural feres)

  1. wild (untamed, not domesticated)
Related terms edit

Further reading edit

Faroese edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

fer

  1. third-person singular present of fara

French edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Middle French fer, from Old French fer, from Latin ferrum.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

fer m (plural fers)

  1. iron
  2. horseshoe; steel tip
  3. (golf) iron
  4. iron (appliance)
  5. (in the plural, archaic) irons, fetters

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

  • Antillean Creole:
  • Haitian Creole:
  • Karipúna Creole French:
  • Louisiana Creole: fèr,

Further reading edit

Hunsrik edit

Etymology edit

Compare Pennsylvania German fer, German für and English for.

Preposition edit

fer

  1. for

Further reading edit

Icelandic edit

Verb edit

fer

  1. inflection of fara:
    1. first-person singular present indicative
    2. third-person singular present indicative

Latin edit

Verb edit

fer

  1. first-person singular present active subjunctive of for
  2. second-person singular present active imperative of ferō

Manx edit

Etymology edit

From Old Irish fer, from Proto-Celtic *wiros, from Proto-Indo-European *wiHrós.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

fer m (plural fir)

  1. man
    Cha nel mee lowal rish y fer aeg shen.I do not approve of that young man.
  2. one (modified by an adjective or demonstrative, referring to an object or animal)
    Ta fer jiarg aym.I have a red one [e.g. chair].
    Ta mee fakin kiare fir ghlassey.I see four green ones [e.g. birds].
    By vie lhiam yn fer shen.I would like that one [e.g. toy].
  3. used as a dummy noun to support a number, referring to a person, object or animal
    Ta fer ennagh ayns shoh laccal dy akin oo.There's a fellow here who wants to see you.
    Ta fer aym.I have one [e.g. chair].
    Ta mee fakin kiare fir.I see four [e.g. birds].

Synonyms edit

Derived terms edit

Mutation edit

Manx mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
fer er ver
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References edit

Mauritian Creole edit

Etymology edit

From French faire.

Verb edit

fer (medial form fer)

  1. To make
  2. To do

Derived terms edit

Middle English edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Old English feorr, from Proto-Germanic *ferrai.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

fer

  1. far, distant
    • a. 1400, Geoffrey Chaucer, “General Prologue”, in The Canterbury Tales, line 493:
      Wide was hys pariſſhe, & houſes ferre a ſondre []
      Wide was his parish, and houses far asunder []

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

References edit

Middle French edit

Etymology edit

From Old French fer.

Noun edit

fer m (plural fers)

  1. iron (metal)
  2. (by extension) (iron) sword

Descendants edit

  • French: fer (see there for further descendants)

Middle Irish edit

Etymology edit

From Old Irish fer, from Primitive Irish *ᚃᚔᚏᚐᚄ (*viras), from Proto-Celtic *wiros, from Proto-Indo-European *wiHrós.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

fer m (genitive fir, nominative plural fir)

  1. man
    • c. 1000, Anonymous, published in (1935) Rudolf Thurneysen, editor, Scéla Mucca Meic Dathó (in Middle Irish), Dublin: Staionery Office, § 1, l. 13, page 2:In fer no·t⟨h⟩ēged iarsint ṡligi do·bered in n-aēl isin coiri, ocus a·taibred din chētgabāil, iss ed no·ithed.Each man who came along the way would put the flesh-fork into the cauldron, and whatever he got at the first taking, it was that which he ate. (literally, The man who…)

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

Mutation edit

Middle Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
fer ḟer fer
pronounced with /β(ʲ)-/
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading edit

Norman edit

 
Norman Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nrf

Alternative forms edit

  • faer (Guernsey)
  • (France, Jersey)

Etymology edit

From Old French fer, from Latin ferrum.

Noun edit

fer m (uncountable)

  1. (Sark) iron

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

Verb edit

fer

  1. present of fara

Occitan edit

Verb edit

fer

  1. Alternative form of faire

Conjugation edit

Old French edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Latin ferrum.

Noun edit

fer oblique singularm (oblique plural fers, nominative singular fers, nominative plural fer)

  1. iron (metal)
  2. (by extension) sword (made of iron)
Descendants edit
  • Middle French: fer
    • French: fer (see there for further descendants)
  • Norman: (France, Jersey), faer (Guernsey), fer (Sark)
  • Walloon: fier

Etymology 2 edit

From Latin ferum, accusative of ferus (wild).

Adjective edit

fer m (oblique and nominative feminine singular fere)

  1. cruel; harsh
  2. fierce; ferocious
    • c. 1120, Philippe de Taon, Bestiaire:
      Quatre pez ad la beste, e mult est de fer estre
      Four feet has the beast, and it is of a very ferocious nature
Declension edit
Descendants edit

References edit

Old High German edit

Etymology edit

From West Proto-Germanic *ferrai., whence also Old English feorr.

Adjective edit

fer

  1. remote

Adverb edit

fer

  1. far

References edit

  1. Braune, Wilhelm. Althochdeutsches Lesebuch, zusammengestellt und mit Glossar versehen

Old Irish edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Primitive Irish *ᚃᚔᚏᚐᚄ (*viras), from Proto-Celtic *wiros, from Proto-Indo-European *wiHrós. Cognates include Latin vir, Sanskrit वीर (vīrá) and Gothic 𐍅𐌰𐌹𐍂 (wair).

Noun edit

fer m (genitive fir, nominative plural fir)

  1. man
  2. husband
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 22c10
      Is bés trá dosom aní-siu cosc inna mban i tossug et a tabairt fo chumacte a feir, armbat irlamu de ind ḟir fo chumacte Dǽi, co·mbí íarum coscitir ind ḟir et do·airbertar fo réir Dǽ.
      This, then, is a custom of his, to correct the wives at first and to bring them under the power of their husbands, so that the husbands may be the readier under God’s power, so that afterwards the husbands are corrected and bowed down in subjection to God.
Declension edit
Masculine o-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative fer ferL firL
Vocative fir ferL firuH
Accusative ferN ferL firuH
Genitive firL fer ferN
Dative fiurL feraib feraib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization
Derived terms edit
Descendants edit

Further reading edit

Etymology 2 edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb edit

fer

  1. second-person singular imperative of feraid

·fer

  1. third-person singular preterite conjunct of feraid

Mutation edit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
fer ḟer fer
pronounced with /β(ʲ)-/
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Old Norse edit

Verb edit

fer

  1. first-person singular present active indicative of fara

Old Saxon edit

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Proto-Germanic *ferro, an old comparative form.

Adverb edit

fer

  1. far
Descendants edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Proto-Germanic *ferro.

Adjective edit

fer

  1. far
Declension edit


Pennsylvania German edit

Etymology edit

Compare German für, Dutch voor, English for, Hunsrik fer.

Preposition edit

fer

  1. for

Piedmontese edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

fer m

  1. iron

Romanian edit

Noun edit

fer n (plural feare)

  1. Alternative form of fier

Declension edit

Romansch edit

Verb edit

fer (Puter)

  1. Alternative form of far (to do; to make)

Scots edit

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

fer (comparative ferther, superlative ferthest)

  1. (Southern Scots) far

Derived terms edit

Serbo-Croatian edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English fair.

Adjective edit

fer (Cyrillic spelling фер)

  1. fair

Adverb edit

fer (Cyrillic spelling фер)

  1. fairly

Welsh edit

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

fer

  1. Soft mutation of ber (short).

Mutation edit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
ber fer mer unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.