exorbitant

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the Late Latin exorbitāns, the present active participle of exorbitō (I go out of the track), from ex (out) + orbita (wheel-track); see orbit. Compare the French exorbitant.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

exorbitant (comparative more exorbitant, superlative most exorbitant)

  1. Exceeding proper limits; excessive or unduly high; extravagant.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:excessive
    It’s a nice car, but they are charging an exorbitant price for it.
    You also have to pay exorbitant interest if you have credit card debt.
    • 1856, George Grote, “Military Operations and Conquests of Alexander, after His Winter-quarters in Persis, down to His Death At Babylon”, in History of Greece, volume XII, London: John Murray, [], part II, page 282:
      But whatever might be the internal thoughts of Macedonian officers, they held their peace before Alexander [the Great], whose formidable character and exorbitant self-estimation would tolerate no criticism.
    • 1874, Thomas Hardy, “Gabriel’s Resolve—The Visit—The Mistake”, in Far from the Madding Crowd. [], volume I, London: Smith, Elder & Co., [], OCLC 2481962, page 38:
      Love, being an extremely exacting usurer (a sense of exorbitant profit, spiritually, by an exchange of hearts, being at the bottom of pure passions, as that of exorbitant profit, bodily or materially, is at the bottom of those of lower atmosphere), every morning his feelings were as sensitive as the money-market in calculations upon his chances.
    • 2015 January 18, Charles M[cRay] Blow, “How expensive is it to be poor [print version: International New York Times, 20 January 2015, page 7]”, in The New York Times:
      [M]any low-income people are "unbanked" (not served by a financial institution), and thus nearly eaten alive by exorbitant fees.

TranslationsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Learned borrowing from Late Latin exorbitāns, present participle of exorbitō (whence exorbiter).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

exorbitant (feminine exorbitante, masculine plural exorbitants, feminine plural exorbitantes)

  1. exorbitant
  2. extortionate

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin exorbitāns.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

exorbitant (strong nominative masculine singular exorbitanter, comparative exorbitanter, superlative am exorbitantesten)

  1. exorbitant
    Synonyms: maßlos, unverschämt

DeclensionEdit

Further readingEdit


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French exorbitant, from Latin exorbitans.

AdjectiveEdit

exorbitant m or n (feminine singular exorbitantă, masculine plural exorbitanți, feminine and neuter plural exorbitante)

  1. extortionate

DeclensionEdit