EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English fynyte, finit, from Latin fīnītus, perfect passive participle of fīniō (I finish; I terminate), from fīnis (boundary).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈfaɪnaɪt/
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

finite (comparative more finite, superlative most finite)

  1. Having an end or limit; (of a quantity) constrained by bounds; (of a set) whose number of elements is a natural number.
    Synonym: limited
  2. (grammar, as opposed to infinite or nonfinite) Limited by (i.e. inflected for) person or number. [from 19th c.]
    The "goes" in "he goes" is a finite form of a verb, the third-person singular.

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

terms derived from finite (adjective)

TranslationsEdit


EsperantoEdit

AdverbEdit

finite

  1. past adverbial passive participle of fini

GermanEdit

AdjectiveEdit

finite

  1. inflection of finit:
    1. strong/mixed nominative/accusative feminine singular
    2. strong nominative/accusative plural
    3. weak nominative all-gender singular
    4. weak accusative feminine/neuter singular

IdoEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

finite

  1. adverbial past passive participle of finar

InterlinguaEdit

ParticipleEdit

finite

  1. past participle of finir

ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /fiˈni.te/
  • Hyphenation: fi‧nì‧te

AdjectiveEdit

finite

  1. feminine plural of finito

VerbEdit

finite

  1. inflection of finire:
    1. second-person plural present indicative
    2. second-person plural imperative
    3. feminine plural past participle

LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

fīnīte (not comparable)

  1. To a certain extent, within limits; limited.
    Antonym: īnfīnītē
  2. Definitely, specifically.

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • finite in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers