Last modified on 8 March 2015, at 03:24

algebra

See also: Algebra, álgebra, and àlgebra

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Medieval Latin, from Arabic word الجبر (al-jabr, reunion, resetting of broken parts) in the title of al-Khwarizmi's influential work الكتاب المختصر في حساب الجبر والمقابلة (al-kitāb al-muxtaṣar fī ḥisāb al-jabr wa-l-muqābala, The Compendious Book on Calculation by Completion and Balancing).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈæl.dʒɪ.bɹə/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈæl.dʒɪ.bɹə/, /ˈæl.dʒə.bɹə/
  • (file)

NounEdit

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

algebra (countable and uncountable, plural algebras)

  1. (uncountable, medicine, historical, rare) The surgical treatment of a dislocated or fractured bone. Also (countable): a dislocation or fracture.
    • a1420, The British Museum Additional MS, 12,056, “Wounds complicated by the Dislocation of a Bone”, in Robert von Fleischhacker editor, Lanfranc's "Science of cirurgie."[1], London: K. Paul, Trench, Trübner & Co, translation of original by Lanfranc of Milan, ISBN 1163911380, published 1894, page 63:
      Ne take noon hede to brynge togidere þe parties of þe boon þat is to-broken or dislocate, til viij. daies ben goon in þe wyntir, & v. in þe somer; for þanne it schal make quytture, and be sikir from swellynge; & þanne brynge togidere þe brynkis eiþer þe disiuncture after þe techynge þat schal be seid in þe chapitle of algebra.
    • 1987, John Newsome Crossley, “Latency”, in The emergence of number[2], Singapore: World Scientific, ISBN 9971504146, Al-Khwarizwi, page 65:
      Algebra is used today by surgeons to mean bone-setting, i.e. the restoration of bones, and the idea of restoration is present in the mathematical context, too.
  2. (uncountable, mathematics) A system for computation using letters or other symbols to represent numbers, with rules for manipulating these symbols.
    • 1551, James A.H. Murray editor, A New English Dictionary on Historical Principles: Founded Mainly on the Materials Collected by the Philological Society.[3], volume 1, Oxford: Clarendon Press, published 1888, Part 1, page 217:
      Also the rule of false position, with dyuers examples not onely vulgar, but some appertaynyng to the rule of Algeber.
  3. (uncountable, mathematics) The study of algebraic structures.
  4. (countable, mathematics) A universal algebra.
  5. (countable, algebra) An algebraic structure consisting of a module of a commutative ring along with an additional binary operation that is bilinear.
  6. (countable, set theory, analysis) A collection of subsets of a given set, such that this collection contains the empty set, and the collection is closed under unions and complements (and thereby also under intersections and differences).
  7. (countable, mathematics) One of several other types of mathematical structure.
  8. (figuratively) A system or process, that is like algebra by substituting one thing for another, or in using signs, symbols, etc., to represent concepts or ideas.
    • 1663, William Clark, William Hugh Logan editor, Marciano; or, The discovery: A tragi-comedy[5], Edinburgh: Reprinted for Private Circulation, ISBN 1446062937, published 1871, page 13:
      Fly ! Fly ! avaunt with that base cowardly gibbrish ; That Algebra of honour ; which had never Been nam'd, if all had equal courage—what?

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit


CzechEdit

NounEdit

algebra f

  1. algebra

Derived termsEdit


DutchEdit

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia nl

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: al‧ge‧bra

NounEdit

algebra f, m (uncountable)

  1. (mathematics) algebra

FinnishEdit

NounEdit

algebra

  1. algebra

DeclensionEdit


ItalianEdit

Italian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia it

EtymologyEdit

Same as English algebra.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /al.d͡ʒɛ.ˈbra/

NounEdit

algebra f (plural algebre)

  1. algebra

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

algebra f (genitive algebrae); first declension

  1. algebra

InflectionEdit

First declension.

Number Singular Plural
nominative algebra algebrae
genitive algebrae algebrārum
dative algebrae algebrīs
accusative algebram algebrās
ablative algebrā algebrīs
vocative algebra algebrae

LatvianEdit

NounEdit

algebra f (4 declension)

  1. algebra

DeclensionEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia no

EtymologyEdit

From Arabic "al-jabr", via Medieval Latin algebra

NounEdit

algebra m (definite singular algebraen, indefinite plural algebraer, definite plural algebraene)

  1. (mathematics) algebra
  2. an algebra textbook

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia nn

EtymologyEdit

From Arabic "al-jabr", via Medieval Latin algebra

NounEdit

algebra m (definite singular algebraen, indefinite plural algebraer, definite plural algebraene)

  1. (mathematics) algebra
  2. an algebra textbook

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


PolishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Italian, Spanish or mediaeval Latin, from Arabic الجبر (al-jabr) “reunion”, “resetting of broken parts”, used in the title of al-Khwarizmi’s influential work الكتاب المختصر في حساب الجبر والمقابلة.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

algebra f

  1. algebra

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

External linksEdit

  • algebra” in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Serbo-CroatianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ǎlɡeːbra/
  • Hyphenation: al‧ge‧bra

NounEdit

àlgēbra f (Cyrillic spelling а̀лге̄бра)

  1. algebra

DeclensionEdit


SpanishEdit

NounEdit

algebra

  1. Misspelling of álgebra.

SwedishEdit

NounEdit

algebra c

  1. (mathematics) algebra

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit