EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Unknown. First used in print by Robert Brown in 1886 (see quote in definition section). Might come from French gâchette or gagée, or from the French family name Gaget, an industrialist who produced promotional gadgets in collaboration with the project to build the statue of Liberty.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gadget (plural gadgets)

  1. (obsolete) A thing whose name cannot be remembered; thingamajig, doohickey.
    • 1886, Robert Brown, Spunyard and Spindrift, A Sailor Boy's Log of a Voyage Out and Home in a China Tea-clipper:
      Then the names of all the other things on board a ship! I don't know half of them yet; even the sailors forget at times, and if the exact name of anything they want happens to slip from their memory, they call it a chicken-fixing, or a gadjet, or a timmey-noggy, or a wim-wom—just pro tem., you know.
  2. Any device or machine, especially one whose name cannot be recalled. Often either clever or complicated.
    He bought a neat new gadget for shredding potatoes.
    That's quite a lot of gadgets you have collected. Do you use any of them?
  3. (informal) Any consumer electronics product.
    • 1987, Kerry Cue, Hang On To Your Horses Doovers, page 5:
      From the Marvel Mixmaster to the Miracle Microwave, every time a new-fangled gadget has lobbed into the Aussie kitchen, Aussie mums have changed their cooking styles accordingly.
  4. (computing) A sequence of machine code instructions crafted as part of an exploit that attempts to divert execution to a memory location chosen by the attacker.

SynonymsEdit

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TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English gadget.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gadget m (plural gadgets)

  1. gadget

Further readingEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English gadget.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gadget m (invariable)

  1. gadget (small device)

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ gadget in Luciano Canepari, Dizionario di Pronuncia Italiana (DiPI)

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Unadapted borrowing from English gadget.

NounEdit

gadget n (plural gadgeturi)

  1. gadget

DeclensionEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English gadget.

PronunciationEdit

 
  • IPA(key): (everywhere but Argentina and Uruguay) /ˈɡaʝet/, [ˈɡa.ʝet̪]
  • IPA(key): (Buenos Aires and environs) /ˈɡaʃet/, [ˈɡa.ʃet̪]
  • IPA(key): (elsewhere in Argentina and Uruguay) /ˈɡaʒet/, [ˈɡa.ʒet̪]

NounEdit

gadget m (plural gadgets)

  1. gadget