Open main menu
See also: exécution

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has articles on:
Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

From Old French execution (c.1360), from Latin executio, an agent noun from exequi (to follow out), from ex (out) + sequor (follow).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˌek.sɪˈkjuː.ʃən/
  • (file)

NounEdit

execution (countable and uncountable, plural executions)

  1. The act, manner or style of executing (actions, maneuvers, performances).
    • 1885, John Ormsby, chapter 1, in Don QuixoteWikisource, volume 1, translation of original by Miguel de Cervantes:
      Already the poor man saw himself crowned by the might of his arm Emperor of Trebizond at least; and so, led away by the intense enjoyment he found in these pleasant fancies, he set himself forthwith to put his scheme into execution.
  2. The state of being accomplished.
    The mission's successful execution lifted the troops' morale.
  3. The act of putting to death or being put to death as a penalty, or actions so associated.
  4. (law) The carrying into effect of a court judgment, or of a will.
  5. (law) The formal process by which a contract is made valid and put into binding effect.
  6. (computing) The carrying out of an instruction, program or program segment by a computer.
    The entire machine slowed down during the execution of the virus checker.

HyponymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Further readingEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin execūtiō, an agent noun from exsequor (follow out), itself from ex + sequor (follow).

NounEdit

execution f (plural executions)

  1. execution (act of putting to death or being put to death as a penalty, or actions so associated)

DescendantsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin execūtiō, an agent noun from exsequor (follow out), itself from ex + sequor (follow).

NounEdit

execution f (oblique plural executions, nominative singular execution, nominative plural executions)

  1. execution (act of putting to death or being put to death as a penalty, or actions so associated)

DescendantsEdit