See also: Venter

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowing from Latin venter (the belly; the womb; a swelling).

NounEdit

venter (plural venters)

  1. A woman with offspring.
  2. (biology) A protuberant, usually hollow structure, notably:
    1. (zootomy) The undersurface of the abdomen of an arthropod.
    2. (botany) The swollen basal portion of an archegonium in which an egg develops.
  3. A broad, shallow concavity, notably of a bone.
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From vent +‎ -er.

NounEdit

venter (plural venters)

  1. One who vents, who is vocal about feelings or problems.
    • 2006, David Laton, Developing Positive Workplace Skills and Attitudes, →ISBN, page 72:
      Venters suffer interpersonally as others avoid their outburst, they become isolated and alone which may result in more venting.

Etymology 3Edit

Cognate with Dutch venter (vendor, peddler).

NounEdit

venter (plural venters)

  1. (obsolete) A vendor.

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

VerbEdit

venter

  1. present of vente

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From venten +‎ -er.

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

NounEdit

venter m (plural venters, diminutive ventertje n)

  1. A vendor, peddler, door-to-door salesman

Derived termsEdit

vendor types, mainly by product

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From vent (wind) +‎ -er, from Latin ventus.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

venter (impersonal)

  1. (impersonal, weather) to be windy, to blow

ConjugationEdit

This verb is impersonal and is conjugated only in the third-person singular.

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

 
Latin Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia la

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Indo-European *wend-tri-, see also German Wanst (belly, paunch), Old High German wanast, Sanskrit वस्ति (vasti, bladder), Latin vēsīca (bladder)[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

venter m (genitive ventris); third declension

  1. (literally)
    1. the belly
      Synonyms: alvus, abdōmen
    2. a paunch, maw, conveying the accessory idea of greediness or gormandizing
    3. (anatomy) the stomach
    4. the body, trunk
  2. (transferred sense)
    1. the womb
      1. an unborn offspring, especially a son
    2. the bowels, entrails
    3. a swelling, protuberance
  3. (figuratively)
    1. sensual lust
    2. gluttony
  This entry needs quotations to illustrate usage. If you come across any interesting, durably archived quotes then please add them!

InflectionEdit

  • Venter has a shaky history, and some sources list it as a consonant stem, but more commonly (e.g. Allen & Greenough) it is listed as an i-stem.

Third-declension noun (i-stem or parisyllabic non-i-stem).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative venter ventrēs
Genitive ventris ventrium
ventrum
Dative ventrī ventribus
Accusative ventrem ventrēs
ventrīs
Ablative ventre ventribus
Vocative venter ventrēs

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • venter”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • venter”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • venter in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to be the slave of one's appetite: ventri deditum esse
  1. ^ “ventre” in: Alberto Nocentini, Alessandro Parenti, “l'Etimologico — Vocabolario della lingua italiana”, Le Monnier, 2010, →ISBN
  2. ^ Wagner, Max Leopold (1960–1964), “bèntre”, in Dizionario etimologico sardo, Heidelberg

LombardEdit

EtymologyEdit

Akin to Italian ventre, from Latin venter.

NounEdit

venter

  1. belly

Norwegian BokmålEdit

VerbEdit

venter

  1. present of vente