Open main menu
See also: Gemma

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
Gemmae on a leaf tip of Syntrichia papillosa

EtymologyEdit

From Latin gemma (bud on a plant).

NounEdit

gemma (plural gemmae)

  1. (botany) A bud; an asexual reproductive structure, as found in liverworts and hydra, able to produce new individuals from a cluster of cells.
    • 1969, Rudolf Mathias Schuster, The Hepaticae and Anthocerotae of North America East of the Hundredth Meridian, Volume 1, Columbia University Press, page 527,
      I know of no other genera with such intramarginal formation of true gemmae.
    • 1990, Anthony John Edwin Smith, The Liverworts of Britain and Ireland, page 2,
      Gemmae are frequently longer than wide or of irregular shape.
      According to Degenkolbe, gemmae-bearing leaves are always different in form from normal leaves.
    • 2005, R. N. Chopra, Biology of Bryophytes, page 32,
      In Marchantia polymorpha, high temperature promotes germination of gemmae (Dacknowski, 1907), and heat absorbed by the gemmae accelerates their germination (Fitting, 1942).

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin gemma.

NounEdit

gemma f (plural gemmes)

  1. gem, jewel

Further readingEdit


InterlinguaEdit

NounEdit

gemma (plural gemmas)

  1. gem

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin gemma.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gemma f (plural gemme)

  1. bud
  2. gem, jewel

VerbEdit

gemma

  1. third-person singular present indicative of gemmare
  2. second-person singular imperative of gemmare

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Two possibilities include:

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gemma f (genitive gemmae); first declension

  1. A bud or eye of a plant.
  2. A jewel.
  3. A thing made of precious stones.

InflectionEdit

First declension.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative gemma gemmae
Genitive gemmae gemmārum
Dative gemmae gemmīs
Accusative gemmam gemmās
Ablative gemmā gemmīs
Vocative gemma gemmae

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • gemma in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • gemma in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • gemma in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • gemma in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • the trees are budding: gemmae proveniunt
  • gemma in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • gemma in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin