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EnglishEdit

 
  glaive on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Old French glaive, from Latin gladius (sword).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

glaive (plural glaives)

  1. A weapon formerly used, consisting of a large blade fixed on the end of a pole, whose edge was on the outside curve.
    • 1786, Francis Grose, A Treatise on Ancient Armour and Weapons, page 52.:
      The Welch Glaive is a kind of bill, sometimes reckoned among the pole axes.
  2. A light lance with a long sharp-pointed head.
  3. (poetically or loosely) A sword.
    • Edmund Spenser:
      The glaive which he did wield.
    • 1913, Francis Thompson, The Works of Francis Thompson, volume II (Poems), London: Burns Oates & Washbourne, OCLC 832969228, page 124:
      Yea, that same awful angel with the glaive / Which in disparadising orbit swept / Lintel and pilaster and architrave

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French glaive, from Latin gladius (sword).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

glaive m (plural glaives)

  1. gladius, short sword
  2. (figuratively) sword

Further readingEdit


Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Probably from an original *glede (from Latin gladius) with influence from Gaulish gladebo (sword). Both terms are ultimately from Proto-Celtic *kladiwos (sword). Alternatively, the d in *glede that had come to be pronounced as /ð/ in Old French may have been fronted to /v/ (perhaps with the additional influence of the aforementioned Gaulish term.)

NounEdit

glaive m (oblique plural glaives, nominative singular glaives, nominative plural glaive)

  1. sword

DescendantsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit