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See also: hóstia

Contents

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰostiyo-, from *ǵʰes- (hand).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hostia f (genitive hostiae); first declension

  1. sacrifice, offering
  2. victim

DeclensionEdit

First declension.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative hostia hostiae
Genitive hostiae hostiārum
Dative hostiae hostiīs
Accusative hostiam hostiās
Ablative hostiā hostiīs
Vocative hostia hostiae

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • hostia in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • hostia in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • hostia in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • hostia in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to slaughter victims: victimas (oxen), hostias (smaller animals, especially sheep) immolare, securi ferire, caedere, mactare
  • hostia in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • hostia in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

PolishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin hostia (victim, sacrifice).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈxɔ.stja/
  • (file)

NounEdit

hostia f

  1. host; communion wafer

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • hostia in Polish dictionaries at PWN

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin hostia (victim, sacrifice).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈostja/, [ˈost̪ja]

NounEdit

hostia f (plural hostias)

  1. communion, communion wafer, wafer, host (religious token)
  2. (vulgar, Spain) a punch or a slap

InterjectionEdit

¡hostia!

  1. (vulgar, Spain) jeez (expression of surprise)
  2. (vulgar, Spain) fuck!

Alternative formsEdit

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit