Contents

EnglishEdit

NounEdit

golpe ‎(plural golpes)

  1. (heraldry) A roundel purpure (purple circular spot).

ReferencesEdit

  • Charles Mackinnon of Dunakin, The Observer's Book of Heraldry, Frederick Warne and Co., p. 60.

AsturianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *colpus, from Latin colaphus(blow; cuff), from Ancient Greek κόλαφος(kólaphos, blow; slap). Cf. Spanish golpe.

NounEdit

golpe m ‎(plural golpes)

  1. hit, blow, shot
  2. bump, knock
  3. amount, load

GalicianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Portuguese colbe, from Vulgar Latin *colpus, from Latin colaphus(blow; cuff), from Ancient Greek κόλαφος(kólaphos, blow; slap), or alternatively from a related Old Portuguese verb. Cf. Portuguese golpe, Spanish golpe.

NounEdit

golpe m ‎(plural golpes)

  1. bump, knock
  2. (figuratively) disgrace

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin vulpēs, vulpem. Compare Portuguese golpelha, French goupil, Romansch golp.

NounEdit

golpe m ‎(plural golpes)

  1. fox

SynonymsEdit


ItalianEdit

NounEdit

golpe f ‎(plural golpi)

  1. mildew, smut

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowing from Spanish golpe. Doublet of colpo.

NounEdit

golpe m ‎(invariable)

  1. a military coup or putsch

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese colbe, golbe, from Vulgar Latin *colpus, from Latin colaphus(blow; cuff), from Ancient Greek κόλαφος(kólaphos, blow; slap). Some sources believe it to have been introduced through a Gallo-Romance intermediate such as Old Provençal colp[1], although this is uncertain. It may alternatively be a derivative of an Old Portuguese verb golpar, golbar. Compare Spanish golpe.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

golpe m (plural golpes)

  1. blow (act of striking or hitting)
    O pivete lhe deu um golpe no rosto.
    The brat gave him a blow to the face.
  2. (figuratively) blow (unfortunate occurrence)
    A derrota foi um golpe.
    The defeat was a blow.
  3. (figuratively) a decisive act or occurrence
    A vitória foi um golpe de sorte.
    The victory was a stroke of luck.
  4. (figuratively) scam (fraudulent deal)
    O empresário deu um golpe na própria empresa.
    The businessman scammed (literally: did a scam on) his own company.
  5. Short for golpe de estado: coup d’état
    Acabou de ocorrer um golpe naquele país.
    A coup d’état just occurred in that country.
  6. gust (abrupt rush of wind)
  7. (obsolete) multitude (great amount, especially of people)

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Spanish colpe, from Vulgar Latin *colpus (attested in Salic Law and the Reichenau Glosses), syncopation of *colŭpus, alteration of Latin colaphus, from Ancient Greek κόλαφος(kólaphos). While some linguists suggest it may possibly be a Gallicism in Hispano-Romance due to its unusual phonetic evolution (e.g. lack of diphtongization of the 'o', final '-e', etc.), upon closer inspection, this is probably not the case. The fact that the Latin word was originally a loanword from Greek, subject to certain sound shifts affecting the short vowels in open syllables, likely had an impact on its development in Romance. The Italian cognate, colpo, also has a closed vowel. As for the final '-e' instead of an '-o' in an expected *golpo, it may be because the Spanish word was actually a derivative of the Old Spanish verb golpar(to wound, hurt), colpar, from a related Vulgar Latin verb *colaphāre (a Late or Vulgar Latin derivation culpatores, referring to a type of gladiator, was attested in a gloss, for *colaphatores, following syncopation); compare French couper, and an Old Portuguese golpar, golbar.[2]

NounEdit

golpe m ‎(plural golpes)

  1. hit, blow, knock
  2. bump, bang
  3. crowd, multitude (of people)
  4. gush (of water), gust (of wind)
  5. blast (of music)
  6. heartbeat
  7. bunch of seedlings (in one hole)
  8. hole (for planting seedlings)
  9. shot, stroke (in billiards)
  10. surprise

Derived termsEdit

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ https://www.infopedia.pt/dicionarios/lingua-portuguesa/golpe
  2. ^ https://www.scribd.com/document/158436236/Diccionario-Critico-Etimologico-castellano-G-MA-Corominas-Joan-pdf