See also: -ick

Contents

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

InterjectionEdit

ick!

  1. An exclamation of disgust
    Lizzie grabbed a frog out of the lake and put it in her hair! Ick!
SynonymsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Back-formation from icky.

NounEdit

ick ‎(uncountable)

  1. (informal) Something distasteful.

AdjectiveEdit

ick

  1. (informal) icky; distasteful or unpleasant.
    • 2012, Sue Moorcroft, Dream a Little Dream
      'It's a bit ick, to be honest, but Rochelle thought it would be funny. Last year we did dragon's diarrhoea, with Tia Maria and chocolate Angel Delight, but nobody would touch it.'
    • 2015, Candy J Starr, Bad Boy Rock Star: The Complete Story
      He thought she would be an embarrassment. That kind of made me feel a bit ick.

Etymology 3Edit

NounEdit

ick ‎(uncountable)

  1. Alternative form of ich (fish disease)

GermanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Low German ick, from Proto-Germanic *ek, from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂.

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

ick ‎(conjunctive)

  1. (Berlin) I
    Ick liebe dir!
    I love you!

Low GermanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Low German ik, from Old Saxon ik, from Proto-Germanic *ek, from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂.

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

ick

  1. I (first person singular pronoun)
    ick schreev di en Breef
    I wrote you a letter
    Ick keem, ick seeg, ick wunn
    I came, I saw, I conquered. (veni, vidi, vici, attributed to Julius Caesar.)

Related termsEdit

  • mien (possessive: my, mine); mi (dative (also generally used in place of the accusative): me); wi (plural: we)