See also: Mien, mień, miến, miền, miễn, and mīen

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French mine (appearance) (whence also Danish mine and German Miene), perhaps from Breton min (face of an animal), or from Latin minio (to redden).[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mien (countable and uncountable, plural miens)

  1. (countable, uncountable) Demeanor; facial expression or attitude, especially one which is intended by its bearer.
    • 1842, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Threnody, page 238:
      Gentlest Guardians marked serene / His early hope, his liberal mien;
    • 1856, Joseph Turnley, The Language of the Eye, OCLC 11907576, page 111:
      Beauty, like all divine gifts, is everywhere to be seen by the eye of the faithful admirer of nature; and, like all spirits, she is scarcely to be described by words. Her countenance and mien, her path, her hue and carriage, often surpass expression, and soothe the enthusiast into reverie and silence.
    • 1860, Stephen Foster (lyrics and music), “Jenny's coming o'er the green”‎[1]:
      Jenny's coming o'er the green, / Fairer form was never seen, / Winning is her gentle mien; / Why do I love her so?
    • 1886 January 5, Robert Louis Stevenson, chapter 7, in Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, London: Longmans, Green, and Co., OCLC 762755901:
      taking the air with an infinite sadness of mien, like some disconsolate prisoner, Utterson saw Dr. Jekyll.
    • 2015 July 23, Siobhan Roberts, “John Horton Conway: the world’s most charismatic mathematician”, in The Guardian[2]:
      Although still young at heart and head, he looks more and more like his old friend Archimedes, increasingly bearded and increasingly grey, with an otherworldly mien – a look that should earn him a spot in the online quiz featuring portraits of frumpy old men under the rubric “Prof or Hobo?”
  2. (countable) A specific facial expression.
    • 2007, February 10, “Claudia La Rocco”, in Stony Miens and Sad Hearts[3]:
      It’s hard to say which is worse: the press-on smiles favored by many a ballet dancer, or the stony “I’m going to pretend this isn’t happening to me” miens often found in contemporary troupes like White Road.

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Le Robert pour tous, Dictionnaire de la langue française, Janvier 2004, p. 727, mine1

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French mien, from Old French meon, from Latin meum, the neuter of meus.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

mien (feminine singular mienne, masculine plural miens, feminine plural miennes)

  1. (archaic) my

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Latin meum.

AdjectiveEdit

mien

  1. (stressed) my; mine

Usage notesEdit

  • chiefly used after an article (un, le, etc.) and before a noun. The noun may be omitted if clear from the context
    un mien fils
    my son
    enveierai le mien
    I will send mine

DescendantsEdit

  • French: mien

Pitcairn-NorfolkEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English main.

AdjectiveEdit

mien

  1. main

PlautdietschEdit

PronounEdit

mien

  1. my

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit


Saterland FrisianEdit

EtymologyEdit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

PronunciationEdit

DeterminerEdit

mien

  1. feminine of min
  2. neuter of min
  3. plural of min

ReferencesEdit

  • Marron C. Fort (2015), “mien”, in Saterfriesisches Wörterbuch mit einer phonologischen und grammatischen Übersicht, Buske, →ISBN

SlovakEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mien

  1. genitive plural of mena

NounEdit

mien

  1. genitive plural of meno

VilamovianEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mien f

  1. carrot

West FrisianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Frisian gemēne, from Proto-West Germanic *gamainī, from Proto-Germanic *gamainiz, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱom-moynis. Cognate with German gemein, English mean, Gothic 𐌲𐌰𐌼𐌰𐌹𐌽𐍃 (gamains) and Latin commūnis.

AdjectiveEdit

mien

  1. common, communal
  2. common, everyday
  3. general

InflectionEdit

Inflection of mien
uninflected mien
inflected miene
comparative miender
miener
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial mien miender
miener
it mienst
it mienste
indefinite c. sing. miene miendere
mienere
mienste
n. sing. mien miender
miener
mienste
plural miene miendere
mienere
mienste
definite miene miendere
mienere
mienste
partitive miens mienders
mieners

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • mien”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011