Translingual

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Symbol

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ik

  1. (international standards) ISO 639-1 language code for Inupiaq.

English

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Phrase

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ik

  1. (Internet slang, text messaging) Alternative letter-case form of IK.

Afrikaans

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Pronunciation

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Pronoun

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ik

  1. (Cape Afrikaans or archaic) Alternative form of ek

Albanian

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Verb

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ik

  1. second-person singular imperative of iki

Angguruk Yali

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Noun

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ik

  1. water

References

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Bergish

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Alternative forms

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  • ek (Barmen (Wuppertal))

Pronoun

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ik

  1. (Mölmsch) I (first person pronoun)

Further reading

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  • H. K. vam Hingberg (that's H. Kühne), Ut auler un neier Tied. Erzählungen in niederdeutscher Mundart [From old and new times (in Low Franconian, more specifically Mölmsch). Stories in Low German dialect (in Standard High German)], 1872 (vol. I)

Danish

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Adverb

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ik

  1. Alternative form of ik'

Dutch

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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From Middle Dutch ic, from Old Dutch ik, from Proto-West Germanic *ik, from Proto-Germanic *ek, from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂. Compare Low German ik, West Frisian ik, German ich, English I, Danish jeg. See I (English, etymology 3).[1]

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): (stressed) /ɪk/, (unstressed) /ək/
  • Audio:(file)
  • Hyphenation: ik
  • Rhymes: -ɪk

Pronoun

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ik

  1. I (first-person singular personal pronoun)

Inflection

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Derived terms

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Descendants

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  • Afrikaans: ek
  • Berbice Creole Dutch: eke
  • Jersey Dutch: äk
  • Petjo: ik
  • Skepi Creole Dutch: ek

References

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  1. ^ Friedrich Kluge (1989) “ik”, in Elmar Seebold, editor, Etymologisches Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache [Etymological Dictionary of the German Language] (in German), 22nd edition, Berlin: Walter de Gruyter, →ISBN

German Low German

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Alternative forms

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  • (enclitic) -'k, 'k
  • (Waldeckisch, when strongly emphasised; scientific spelling) ikə
  • ick
  • (as alternative form of ick, enclitic) 'ck
  • (as alternative form of ick, when strongly emphasised, rare) icke
  • (Eastphalia, Lippe, County of Mark, Ruhr area) ek, eck
  • (Low Prussian) öck, eck

Etymology

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From Middle Low German ik, from Old Saxon ik, from Proto-Germanic *ek, from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂.

Pronunciation

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Pronoun

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ik

  1. (most northern and western dialects) I (first person singular pronoun)
    Ik kem, ik sach, ik wünd.
    I came, I saw, I conquered. (Veni, vidi, vici. Attributed to Julius Caesar.)

Declension

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In Störmede:[1]

1st person 2nd person 3rd person
Masculine Feminine Neuter
Singular Nominative ik diu hoi soi iät
(Genitive) (van meune) (van deune) (van seune) (van iähre) (van seune)
Dative meu deu iähne iähr iähne
Accusative soi iät
Plural Nominative weu jeu soi
(Genitive) (van use) (van jiue) (van iähre)
Dative us jiu iähnen
Accusative soi
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  • mien (my, mine, possessive); mi (me, dative (also generally used in place of the accusative)); mik; wi pl (we)
  • Sauerländisch: mey, mik
  • Paderbornisch: mey/my, mik; plural: wey/wy

See also

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References

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  1. ^ Franz Kemper: Stürmeder Platt: Wi et lutt düt un dat. 1998, p. 18

Gothic

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Romanization

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ik

  1. Romanization of 𐌹𐌺

Kaqchikel

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Noun

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ik

  1. sun
  2. chili

Latvian

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Adverb

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ik

  1. every

Marshallese

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Noun

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ik

  1. Alternative spelling of ek

Middle English

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Etymology

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From Old English ic, perhaps with influence from Old Norse ek; both from Proto-Germanic *ik, *ek, from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂ (I).

Pronunciation

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Pronoun

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ik

  1. (chiefly Northern dialectal) Alternative form of I
    • circa 1300, Homilies:
      Forthi wil I of my pouert, Schau sum thing that ik haf in hert, [...]
      (please add an English translation of this quotation)
    • circa 1300, Cursor Mundi:
      Her ik haf a litil spend, In word eftir þat ik entend, [...]
      (please add an English translation of this quotation)
    • circa 1390, Chaucer:
      But ik am oold me list not pleye for age.
      (please add an English translation of this quotation)

Descendants

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Middle Low German

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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From Old Saxon ik

Pronunciation

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Pronoun

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ik

  1. I (first person singular nominative)

Declension

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Descendants

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Mokilese

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Pronunciation

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IPA(key): /ˈik/

Noun

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ik

  1. tail

Inflection

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North Frisian

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Etymology

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From Old Frisian ik, from Proto-West Germanic *ik, from Proto-Germanic *ek, *ik, from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂.

Compare Dutch ik, German Low German ik, German ich, English I, Danish jeg.

Pronunciation

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Pronoun

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ik

  1. I

Old Dutch

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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From Proto-West Germanic *ik.

Pronoun

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ik

  1. I

Declension

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Descendants

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  • Middle Dutch: ic, icke
    • Dutch: ik
      • Afrikaans: ek
      • Berbice Creole Dutch: eke
      • Jersey Dutch: äk
      • Petjo: ik
      • Skepi Creole Dutch: ek

Further reading

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  • ik”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012

Old Frisian

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Etymology

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From Proto-West Germanic *ik, from Proto-Germanic *ek, *ik, from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂.

Compare Old Saxon ik, Old English , Old Dutch ik, Old High German ih, Old Norse ek, Gothic 𐌹𐌺 (ik).

Pronoun

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ik

  1. I

Inflection

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Descendants

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  • North Frisian: ick, ik
  • Saterland Frisian: iek
  • West Frisian: ik

Old Saxon

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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From Proto-West Germanic *ik, from Proto-Germanic *ek, from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂.

Compare Old Frisian ik, Old English , Old Dutch ik, Old High German ih, Old Norse ek, Gothic 𐌹𐌺 (ik).

Pronoun

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ik

  1. I

Declension

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Descendants

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  • Middle Low German: ik, ek
    • German Low German: ik

Pass Valley Yali

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Noun

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ik

  1. water

References

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Pwaamei

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Etymology

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From Proto-Oceanic *kutu, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *kutu, from Proto-Austronesian *kuCu.

Noun

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ik

  1. louse

References

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  • Jim Hollyman, K. J. Hollyman, Études sur les langues du Nord de la Nouvelle-Calédonie (1999), page 52

Salar

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Etymology

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From Proto-Turkic *īk. Cognate with Azerbaijani iy, Turkish , Turkmen īk.

Pronunciation

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  • (Shixiang, Xunhua, Qinghai) IPA(key): [ix]

Noun

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ik

  1. spindle

References

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  • Potanin, G.N. (1893) “их”, in Тангутско-Тибетская окраина Китая и Центральная Монголия (in Russian), page 427

Tobian

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Etymology

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From Proto-Austronesian *Sikan.

Noun

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ik

  1. Fish

Alternative forms

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Vandalic

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Etymology

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From Proto-Germanic *ek

Pronoun

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ik

  1. I

References

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  1. https://glosbe.com/en/xvn/I

Wastek

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Noun

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ik

  1. wind

References

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West Frisian

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Etymology

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From Old Frisian ik, from Proto-West Germanic *ik, from Proto-Germanic *ek, *ik, from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂.

Pronunciation

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Pronoun

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ik

  1. I (first person singular nominative pronoun)

Inflection

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Further reading

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  • ik (I)”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

Zealandic

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Pronoun

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ik

  1. I