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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French impur, from Latin impurus

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

impure (comparative more impure, superlative most impure)

  1. Not pure
    1. Containing undesired intermixtures
      The impure gemstone was not good enough to be made into a necklace, so it was thrown out.
    2. Unhallowed; defiled by something unholy, either physically by an objectionable substance, or morally by guilt or sin
    3. Unchaste; obscene (not according to or not abiding by some system of sexual morality)
      He was thinking impure thoughts involving a girl from school.
      • 2012, Frederick Ramsay, The Eighth Veil: A Jerusalem Mystery
        “No one would marry her if she was impure, don't you see?” “Impure? Surely if a woman is forcibly deprived of her virginity, she can't be thought of as impure.”

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

impure (third-person singular simple present impures, present participle impuring, simple past and past participle impured)

  1. (transitive, obsolete) to defile; to pollute

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

AdjectiveEdit

impure

  1. feminine singular of impur

ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

impure f pl

  1. feminine plural of impuro

LatinEdit

AdjectiveEdit

impūre

  1. vocative masculine singular of impūrus

AdverbEdit

impūrē (comparative impūrius, superlative impūrissimē)

  1. basely, shamefully, infamously
  2. impurely

ReferencesEdit