Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Late Latin intellēctus ‎(understanding, intellect), perfect passive participle of Latin intellegō ‎(understand; reason), from inter ‎(between, among) + legō ‎(read), with connotation of bind.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

intellect ‎(countable and uncountable, plural intellects)

  1. the faculty of thinking, judging, abstract reasoning, and conceptual understanding; the cognitive faculty (uncountable)
    Intellect is one of man's greatest powers.
  2. the capacity of that faculty (in a particular person) (uncountable)
    They were chosen because of their outstanding intellect.
  3. a person who has that faculty to a great degree
    Some of the world's leading intellects were meeting there.

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

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See alsoEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Late Latin intellēctus ‎(understanding, intellect), perfect passive participle of Latin intellegō ‎(understand; reason).

NounEdit

intellect m ‎(plural intellects)

  1. intellect
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