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EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Existing since Middle English, borrowed from Old French entent or entente, ultimately from Latin intentus. Modified later in spelling to align more closely with the Latin word. Compare intention.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

intent (countable and uncountable, plural intents)

  1. A purpose; something that is intended.
  2. (law) The state of someone’s mind at the time of committing an offence.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

intent (comparative more intent, superlative most intent)

  1. Firmly fixed or concentrated on something.
    a mind intent on self-improvement
    • 2014, Daniel Taylor, "World Cup 2014: Uruguay sink England as Suárez makes his mark," guardian.co.uk, 20 June:
      Uruguay were quick to the ball, strong in the tackle and seemed intent on showing they were a better team than had been apparent in their defeat to Costa Rica.
    • 1907, Robert William Chambers, chapter I, in The Younger Set, New York, N.Y.: D. Appleton & Company, OCLC 24962326:
      And it was while all were passionately intent upon the pleasing and snake-like progress of their uncle that a young girl in furs, ascending the stairs two at a time, peeped perfunctorily into the nursery as she passed the hallway—and halted amazed.
  2. Engrossed.
  3. Unwavering from a course of action.

TranslationsEdit

Related termsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin intentus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

intent m (plural intents)

  1. try, intent

Related termsEdit