See also: körd

CebuanoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English cord, from Old French corde, from Latin chorda, from Ancient Greek (Doric) χορδά (khordá), Ionic χορδή (khordḗ, string of gut, the string of a lyre).

PronunciationEdit

  • Hyphenation: kord

NounEdit

kord

  1. a long, thin, flexible length of twisted yarns (strands) of fiber
  2. an electrical cord

CzechEdit

 
Czech Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia cs

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Probably from Hungarian kard, originally from Middle Persian [script needed] (kārd, knife).[1][2]

NounEdit

kord m

  1. smallsword
  2. (fencing) épée
DeclensionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

kord m

  1. cord (woven fabric used especially in tyres)
DeclensionEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Machek, Václav (1968) Etymologický slovník jazyka českého, 2nd edition, Prague: Academia
  2. ^ "kord" in Jiří Rejzek, Český etymologický slovník, electronic version, Leda, 2007

EstonianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Finnic *kerta, borrowed from a Baltic language, compare Old Prussian kērdā and Lithuanian kartas. Cognate with Finnish kerta and Votic kõrta.

NounEdit

kord (genitive korra, partitive korda)

  1. time, occasion
  2. order, regime, system

DeclensionEdit

AdverbEdit

kord

  1. once, once upon a time, someday
    Sellest poisist tuleb kord üks kuulus mees.
    That boy will someday grow up to be a famous man.
    Elasid kord eit ja taat.
    Once upon a time there lived an old woman and old man.
  2. (emphatic) finally, at last
    Jäta mind juba kord rahule!
    Leave me alone, will you!



PolishEdit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

EtymologyEdit

From Hungarian kard, from Persian کارد‎.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

kord m inan

  1. cutlass (a short sword with a curved blade)

DeclensionEdit