See also: Weary and wearþ

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English wery, weri, from Old English wēriġ (weary), from Proto-West Germanic *wōrīg, *wōrag (weary). Cognate with Saterland Frisian wuurich (weary, tired), West Frisian wurch (tired), Dutch dialectal wurrig (exhausted), Old Saxon wōrig (weary), Old High German wōrag, wuarag (drunken).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

weary (comparative wearier, superlative weariest)

  1. Having the strength exhausted by toil or exertion; tired; fatigued.
    A weary traveller knocked at the door.
  2. Having one's patience, relish, or contentment exhausted; tired; sick.
    soldiers weary of marching, or of confinement;  I grew weary of studying and left the library.
  3. Expressive of fatigue.
    He gave me a weary smile.
  4. Causing weariness; tiresome.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

VerbEdit

weary (third-person singular simple present wearies, present participle wearying, simple past and past participle wearied)

  1. To make or to become weary.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:tire

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See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit