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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Probably from Irish lag (weak), from Old Irish lac, from Proto-Celtic *laggos, from Proto-Indo-European *(s)leh₁g-.

NounEdit

lage (uncountable)

  1. (obsolete, Britain, thieves' cant) Water; any weak alcoholic beverage.
    • 1641–42, Brome, Richard, A Jovial Crew, or the Merry Beggars, Act 2:
      I bowse no lage, but a whole gage / Of this I'll bowse to you.

VerbEdit

lage (third-person singular simple present lages, present participle laging, simple past and past participle laged)

  1. (obsolete, Britain, thieves' cant) To drink.
    • 1566, Harman, Thomas, A Caveat or Warning for Common Cursitors:
      I saye by the Salomon I will lage it of with a gage of Benebouse; then cut to my nose watch.

ReferencesEdit

  • [Francis Grose] (1788), “Lage”, in A Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue, 2nd corrected and enlarged edition, London: Printed for S. Hooper, [], OCLC 3138643.
  • “lage” in Albert Barrère and Charles G[odfrey] Leland, compilers and editors, A Dictionary of Slang, Jargon & Cant, volume II (L–Z), Edinburgh: The Ballantyne Press, 1889–1890, page 2.
  • Farmer, John Stephen (1896) Slang and Its Analogues[1], volume 4, pages 144

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

Etymology 1Edit

AdjectiveEdit

lage

  1. Inflected form of laag

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

lage

  1. (archaic) singular past subjunctive of liggen

Etymology 3Edit

Dialectal form of laai.

NounEdit

lage f (plural lagen)

  1. (obsolete) A (flickering) flame.

Haitian CreoleEdit

EtymologyEdit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

VerbEdit

lage

  1. release, let go

Middle DutchEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Dutch *lāgi, from Proto-Germanic *lēgijaz.

AdjectiveEdit

lâge

  1. low, close to the ground
  2. low in rank/stature, unimportant
InflectionEdit

This adjective needs an inflection-table template.

Alternative formsEdit
DescendantsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Dutch *lāga, from Proto-Germanic *lēgō.

NounEdit

lâge f

  1. position, lie
  2. lodge, place to sleep
  3. layer
  4. trap, snare
  5. ambush
  6. treachery
  7. condition, situation
InflectionEdit

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

DescendantsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • laghe (I)”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • laghe (IV)”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • lage (I)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, 1929
  • lage (V)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, 1929

Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

lage

  1. Alternative form of lawe

Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the noun lag

VerbEdit

lage (imperative lag, present tense lager, passive lages, simple past laga or laget or lagde, past participle laga or laget or lagd, present participle lagende)

  1. to make (something)

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

VerbEdit

lage (present tense lagar, past tense laga, past participle laga, passive infinitive lagast, present participle lagande, imperative lag/lage)

  1. Alternative form of laga

Old EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

lage f

  1. law, ordinance, rule, regulation; right, legal privilege