Open main menu
See also: Martial

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English martial, marciāl, mercial, mercialle (relating to war, warlike; military; for use in fighting or warfare; brave, hardy; combative, fierce; ruthless, vicious; domineering, overbearing),[1] from Middle French martial (modern French martial (martial)), or directly from its etymon Latin mārtiālis (of or pertaining to Mars, the Roman god of war), from Mārtius (of or pertaining to Mars) + -ālis (suffix forming adjectives of relationship). The English word is cognate with Italian marziale (martial), Portuguese marcial (martial), Spanish marcial (martial).[2]

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

martial (comparative more martial, superlative most martial)

  1. Of, relating to, or suggestive of war; warlike.
  2. Connected with or relating to armed forces or the profession of arms or military life.
  3. Characteristic of or befitting a warrior; having a military bearing; soldierly.
    Synonyms: soldierlike, warriorlike
  4. (astrology, obsolete) Pertaining to the astrological influence of the planet Mars.
  5. (astronomy, obsolete) Of or relating to the planet Mars; Martian.
  6. (chemistry, medicine, obsolete) Containing, or relating to, iron (which was symbolically associated with the planet Mars by alchemists); chalybeate, ferric, ferrous.
    martial preparations martial flowers (a reddish crystalline salt of iron)

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

NounEdit

martial (plural martials)

  1. (obsolete) A soldier, a warrior.
  2. (astrology, obsolete) A celestial object under the astrological influence of the planet Mars.
  3. (chiefly science fiction, obsolete) Synonym of Martian (inhabitant of the planet Mars)

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ marciāl, adj.(1)” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 29 March 2019.
  2. ^ martial, adj. and n.”, in OED Online  , Oxford: Oxford University Press, December 2000; “martial” (US) / “martial” (UK) in Oxford Dictionaries, Oxford University Press.

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


DalmatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

NounEdit

martial

  1. hammer

ReferencesEdit

  • 2000, Matteo Giulio Bartoli, Il Dalmatico: Resti di un’antica lingua romanza parlata da Veglia a Ragusa e sua collocazione nella Romània appenino-balcanica, Istituto della Enciclopedia Italiana.

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin martialis of Mars (Roman god of war)

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

martial (feminine singular martiale, masculine plural martiaux, feminine plural martiales)

  1. martial

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit