See also: Mead and méad

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English mede, from Old English medu, from Proto-Germanic *meduz, from Proto-Indo-European *médʰu (honey; honey wine).

NounEdit

mead (usually uncountable, plural meads)

  1. An alcoholic drink fermented from honey and water.
    • 1837, L[etitia] E[lizabeth] L[andon], Ethel Churchill: Or, The Two Brides. [], volume I, London: Henry Colburn, [], OCLC 21345056, page 47:
      "Just come in," said Mrs. Churchill, "and take one glass of my mead." / "No—not even such a golden promise tempts me. I am afraid that Lord Marchmont will be at home before me—and he is not yet accustomed to be kept waiting."
  2. (US) A drink composed of syrup of sarsaparilla or other flavouring extract, and water, and sometimes charged with carbon dioxide.
Alternative formsEdit
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See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English mede (meadow), from Old English mǣd. Cognate with West Frisian miede, Mede, German Low German Meed, Dutch made.

NounEdit

mead (plural meads)

  1. (poetic) A meadow.
Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

mead

  1. second-person plural imperative of mear

YolaEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English mede, from Old English mǣd.

NounEdit

mead

  1. meadow

ReferencesEdit

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith, page 56