See also: Polis, polís, pólis, poliš, and -polis

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Learned borrowing from Ancient Greek πόλις (pólis, fortified town; city state).

NounEdit

polis (plural poleis or polises)

  1. (historical) A Greek city-state.
    • 2006, Karen Armstrong, The Great Transformation, Atlantic Books 2007, page 161:
      By the end of the century, poleis had been established throughout the Hellenic world, all bearing a marked family resemblance.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from Scots polis.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

polis (countable and uncountable, plural polises)

  1. (uncountable, Scotland, Ireland, Tyneside) The police.
  2. (countable, Scotland, Ireland, Tyneside) A police officer.

Further readingEdit

  • Oxford Dictionaries Online. "polis". 2015.
  • A Dictionary of North East Dialect, Bill Griffiths, 2005, Northumbria University Press, →ISBN

AnagramsEdit


AzerbaijaniEdit

Other scripts
Cyrillic полис
Roman polis
Perso-Arabic پولیس

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [poˈlis]
  • Hyphenation: pol‧is

NounEdit

polis (definite accusative polisi, plural polislər)

  1. police (an organisation that enforces the law)
    polis idarəsipolice department
    polis şöbəsipolice station, police district
    polis əməkdaşıpolice employee
  2. police (member of the police force)

DeclensionEdit


CebuanoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English police, from Middle French police, from Latin politia (state, government), from Ancient Greek πολιτεία (politeía).

NounEdit

polis

  1. A police officer; a cop.
  2. A civil force granted the legal authority for law enforcement and maintaining public order.

CzechEdit

EtymologyEdit

Ancient Greek πόλις (pólis)

NounEdit

polis f

  1. polis (ancient Greek city-state)

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈpoː.lɪs/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: po‧lis

Etymology 1Edit

From Italian polizza, from Latin apodixa, from Ancient Greek ἀπόδειξις (apódeixis, proof), from ἀποδείκνυμι (apodeíknumi, I prove).

NounEdit

polis f (plural polissen, diminutive polisje n)

  1. insurance policy
  2. insurance plan
Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Indonesian: polis

Etymology 2Edit

From Ancient Greek πόλις (pólis).

NounEdit

polis f (plural poleis)

  1. (historical) A polis; an ancient, especially Ancient Greek, city state or city.

FrenchEdit

VerbEdit

polis

  1. first-person singular present indicative of polir
  2. second-person singular present indicative of polir
  3. first-person singular past historic of polir
  4. second-person singular past historic of polir
  5. second-person singular imperative of polir

ParticipleEdit

polis

  1. masculine plural of the past participle of polir

AdjectiveEdit

polis

  1. masculine plural of poli

AnagramsEdit


IndonesianEdit

 
Indonesian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia id

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /polɪs/
  • Hyphenation: po‧lis

Etymology 1Edit

From Dutch polis (insurance policy), from Italian polizza, from Latin apodixa, from Ancient Greek ἀπόδειξις (apódeixis, proof), from ἀποδείκνυμι (apodeíknumi, I prove).

NounEdit

polis (plural, first-person possessive polisku, second-person possessive polismu, third-person possessive polisnya)

  1. insurance policy

Derived termsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

  1. Nonstandard form of poles.

Usage notesEdit

The word is part of false friends between Standard Malay and Indonesian. The Brunei, Malaysia and Singapore usage can be seen in Malay polis.

Further readingEdit


LatinEdit

NounEdit

polīs

  1. dative plural of polus
  2. ablative plural of polus

ReferencesEdit

  • polis in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • polis in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • polis in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray
  • polis in William Smith, editor (1854, 1857) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography, volume 1 & 2, London: Walton and Maberly

LatvianEdit

 
Latvian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia lv

EtymologyEdit

Ultimately from Polish polak, Russian поля́к (polják) (under the influence of Old High German pōl — cf. German, English Pole — and perhaps also of Latvian dialectal bolis, polis (ox without horns)), itself derived from Polish pole (field), perhaps from Proto-Indo-European *pel- (light (color), gray).[1]

PronunciationEdit

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NounEdit

polis m (2nd declension, feminine form: poliete)

  1. a Pole, a Polish man, a man born in Poland
    pēc Livonijas kara poļi ieguva Vidzemi un Latgaliafter the Livonian War the Poles obtained Vidzeme and Latgale
  2. (genitive plural) Polish; pertaining to Poland and its people
    poļu valodathe Polish language
    poļu mākslaPolish art

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Karulis, Konstantīns (1992) , “polis”, in Latviešu Etimoloģijas Vārdnīca (in Latvian), Rīga: AVOTS, →ISBN

MalayEdit

 
Malay Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ms

EtymologyEdit

From English police.

NounEdit

polis (plural polis-polis, informal 1st possessive polisku, impolite 2nd possessive polismu, 3rd possessive polisnya)

  1. police, a civil force granted the legal authority for law enforcement and maintaining public order.

Alternative formsEdit

Usage notesEdit

The word is part of false friends between Standard Malay and Indonesian due to shared etymology. The Indonesian usage can be seen in Indonesian polis.


PapiamentuEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Spanish policía and Portuguese polícia and Dutch politie.

NounEdit

polis

  1. police
  2. policeman



ScotsEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From the French police.

NounEdit

polis (countable and uncountable, plural polises)

  1. (uncountable) police
    • 1987, Robbie Kydd, ...Auld Zimmery, Mariscat Press 1987:
      'Listen then. Yer name's Andy MacPhail. That's whit us three has jist tellt the polis in wir statements. Okay?'
    • 1991, Dr James Begg, Dipper: 20 – Cops and Robbers, Luath Press 1991:
      ‘Aye, Andra,' cam back the reply. 'We micht as weel caa it a day doun here. The hale bluidy place is hotchin wi polis! Come doun an get us at the Auld Raw.'
    • 2007, Sheena Blackhall, The Quarry, Lochlands 2007:
      Brian hid contactit his granfaither, Pat, tae see gin the polis computers could raik up onythin ava tae makk eese o in persuadin Bappy Anderson tae pairt wi a kidney.
    • 2013, Donal McLaughlin, translating Pedro Lenz, Naw Much of a Talker, Freight Books 2013, p. 51:
      Coont yirsel lucky ahm naw cawin the polis. Noo fuck off.

Etymology 2Edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

AdjectiveEdit

polis

  1. Polish

VerbEdit

polis

  1. polish
  2. adorn, beautify

ReferencesEdit


SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

 
Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia es

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

polis m pl or f pl

  1. plural of poli

Etymology 2Edit

From Ancient Greek πόλις (pólis, city-state).

NounEdit

polis f (plural polis)

  1. polis

SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

polis c

  1. police (as an organization or as an individual)

DeclensionEdit

Declension of polis 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative polis polisen poliser poliserna
Genitive polis polisens polisers polisernas

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Tok PisinEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From English police.

NounEdit

polis

  1. police

Etymology 2Edit

From English polish.

NounEdit

polis

  1. polish

TurkishEdit

 
Turkish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia tr

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French police.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /poˈlis/
  • Hyphenation: po‧lis

NounEdit

polis (definite accusative polisi, plural polisler)

  1. police (an organisation that enforces the law)
  2. police officer

Usage notesEdit

DeclensionEdit

Inflection
Nominative polis
Definite accusative polisi
Singular Plural
Nominative polis polisler
Definite accusative polisi polisleri
Dative polise polislere
Locative poliste polislerde
Ablative polisten polislerden
Genitive polisin polislerin
Possessive forms
Singular Plural
1st singular polisim polislerim
2nd singular polisin polislerin
3rd singular polisi polisleri
1st plural polisimiz polislerimiz
2nd plural polisiniz polisleriniz
3rd plural polisleri polisleri
Predicative forms
Singular Plural
1st singular polisim polislerim
2nd singular polissin polislersin
3rd singular polis
polistir
polisler
polislerdir
1st plural polisiz polisleriz
2nd plural polissiniz polislersiniz
3rd plural polisler polislerdir

SynonymsEdit