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See also: moussé

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

French mousse (foam, froth), from Old French mosse (moss), from Frankish or Old Dutch mosa (moss), from Proto-Germanic *musą (moss, bog, marsh). More at moss.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mousse (countable and uncountable, plural mousses)

  1. An airy pudding served chilled, particularly chocolate mousse.
  2. A savory dish, of meat or seafood, containing gelatin.
  3. A styling cream used for hair.
    He slicked his hair back with mousse, but the cowlick still stuck up.
  4. A stable emulsion of water and oil that is created by wave action churning the water where an oil spill occurs.
    • 1987, D.F. Boesch & ‎N.N. Rabalais, Long-term Environmental Effects of Offshore Oil and Gas Development, →ISBN:
      Pretreatment of oil or sea water with dispersants or demulsifiers generally inhibits laboratory mousse formation with most of the oils and petroleum products tested (Berridge et al. , 1968b; Bridie et al. , 1980a,b).
    • 1993, John R. Clayton, James R. Payne, & John S. Farlow, Oil Spill Dispersants: Mechanisms of Action and Laboratory Tests, →ISBN, page 21:
      A number of investigators have shown that the starting composition of a parent oil can have a major influence on its predisposittion to form stable water-in-oil emulsions (mousse). For example, the presence of natural surfactants in the wax, resin, and asphaltene fractions of oils has been positively correlated with the tendency to form mousse.
    • 1994, Dana Stabenow, A Cold-Blooded Business, →ISBN, page 50:
      When it washed ashore in Prince William Sound, the crude came in sticky gobs, in tar balls, in what they called mousse, crude whipped to a froth in the action of the sea.
    • 2009, Elspeth Leacock, The Exxon Valdez Oil Spill, →ISBN, page 37:
      However, the sticky mousse clogged all of the skimmers, even the Vaydaghubsky. If all these skimmers had been on-site during the first three days of calm weather, before the oil was churned into mousse, they could have made a real difference

DescendantsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

mousse (third-person singular simple present mousses, present participle moussing, simple past and past participle moussed)

  1. To apply mousse (styling cream).
    He moussed his hair in the morning and then washed it out at night.

AnagramsEdit


FinnishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French mousse.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈmou̯sːe/, [ˈmo̞u̯s̠ːe̞], IPA(key): /ˈmuseː/, [ˈmus̠e̞ː], IPA(key): /ˈmuse/, [ˈmus̠e̞]
  • Hyphenation: mous‧se

NounEdit

mousse

  1. mousse

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of mousse (Kotus type 8/nalle, no gradation)
nominative mousse mousset
genitive moussen moussejen
partitive moussea mousseja
illative mousseen mousseihin
singular plural
nominative mousse mousset
accusative nom. mousse mousset
gen. moussen
genitive moussen moussejen
mousseinrare
partitive moussea mousseja
inessive moussessa mousseissa
elative moussesta mousseista
illative mousseen mousseihin
adessive moussella mousseilla
ablative mousselta mousseilta
allative mousselle mousseille
essive moussena mousseina
translative mousseksi mousseiksi
instructive moussein
abessive moussetta mousseitta
comitative mousseineen

FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Originally from a dialect south of the Loire, from Vulgar Latin *muttius (compare Occitan mos), of Gaulish origin, or alternatively from Latin mutilus (compare Italian mozzo).

AdjectiveEdit

mousse (plural mousses)

  1. blunt

Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old French mosse (moss), from Frankish *mosa (moss), from Proto-Germanic *musą (moss).

For the culinary sense one might suspect influence by Dutch moes, German Mus (both “mush, purée”). However, the metaphorical use of mousse for “foam” is older and the culinary sense can thence be derived without difficulty.

 
mousse

NounEdit

mousse f (plural mousses)

  1. moss (the plant)
  2. bryophyte (in the broad sense)
  3. foam
  4. mousse (dessert)
DescendantsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Borrowed from Spanish mozo.

NounEdit

mousse m (plural mousses)

  1. A boy serving on a ship: a cabin boy.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 4Edit

VerbEdit

mousse

  1. first-person singular present indicative of mousser
  2. third-person singular present indicative of mousser
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of mousser
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of mousser
  5. second-person singular imperative of mousser

Further readingEdit


HungarianEdit

NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French mousse, from Spanish mozo.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mousse m (plural mousses)

  1. (Jersey, nautical) cabin boy

NounEdit

mousse m or f (plural mousses)

  1. (Jersey) child

PortugueseEdit

NounEdit

mousse f or m (nonstandard) (plural mousses)

  1. Alternative spelling of musse

SpanishEdit

NounEdit

mousse f (plural mousses)

  1. mousse