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See also: ñuke

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EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Clipping of nuc(lear weapon).[1] The verb is derived from the noun.[2]

NounEdit

nuke (plural nukes)

  1. (chiefly US, colloquial) A nuclear weapon.
  2. (chiefly US, colloquial, by extension) Something that destroys or negates, especially on a catastrophic scale.
  3. (chiefly US, nautical, colloquial) A vessel such as a ship or submarine running on nuclear power.
  4. (chiefly US, colloquial) A nuclear power station.
  5. (chiefly US, colloquial) A microwave oven.
    Just put it in the nuke for two minutes and it will be ready to eat.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

nuke (third-person singular simple present nukes, present participle nuking, simple past and past participle nuked)

  1. (transitive, chiefly US, colloquial) To use a nuclear weapon on a target.
    If a nuclear war ever breaks out, military facilities are likely to be nuked first.
  2. (transitive, chiefly US, colloquial, figuratively) To destroy or erase completely.
    Synonyms: annihilate, devastate, obliterate; see also Thesaurus:destroy
    To try to hide his posting history on Usenet, he had his posts nuked from the Google archives.
  3. (transitive, Internet slang, by extension) To carry out a denial-of-service attack against (an IRC user).
  4. (transitive, chiefly US, colloquial) To expose to some form of radiation.
  5. (transitive, chiefly US, colloquial) To cook in a microwave oven.
    I’ll nuke some pizza for dinner.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Clipping of nuc(leus).

NounEdit

nuke (plural nukes)

  1. Alternative spelling of nuc (nucleus colony of bees)

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Compare “nuke, n.2 and adj.”, in OED Online  , Oxford: Oxford University Press, December 2003; “nuke” (US) / “nuke” (UK) in Oxford Dictionaries, Oxford University Press.
  2. ^ nuke, v.”, in OED Online  , Oxford: Oxford University Press, December 2003.

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit