duplicate

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Latin duplicātus, perfect passive participle of duplicō.

PronunciationEdit

Noun, adjective

Verb

  • IPA(key): /ˈdjuː.plɪˌkeɪt/
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

duplicate (not comparable)

  1. being the same as another; identical. This may exclude the first identical item in a series, but usage is inconsistent.
    This is a duplicate entry.

VerbEdit

duplicate (third-person singular simple present duplicates, present participle duplicating, simple past and past participle duplicated)

  1. to make a copy of
    If we duplicate the information, are we really accomplishing much?
  2. to do repeatedly; to do again
    You don't need to duplicate my efforts.
  3. to produce something equal to
    He found it hard to duplicate the skills of his wife.

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

NounEdit

duplicate (plural duplicates)

  1. One that resembles or corresponds to another; an identical copy.
    This is a duplicate, but a very good replica.
    • Sir W. Temple
      I send a duplicate both of it and my last dispatch.
  2. (law) An original instrument repeated; a document which is the same as another in all essential particulars, and differing from a mere copy in having all the validity of an original.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Burrill to this entry?)
  3. The game of duplicate bridge.
    • 1999, Matthew Granovetter, Murder at the Bridge Table (page 6)
      The momentary madness which infects bridge players occurs frequently at rubber bridge and duplicate; and though it rarely results in murder, it often terminates marriages and close friendships []
  4. The game of duplicate Scrabble.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit


ItalianEdit

VerbEdit

duplicate

  1. second-person plural present indicative of duplicare
  2. second-person plural imperative of duplicare
  3. feminine plural past participle of duplicare

LatinEdit

VerbEdit

duplicāte

  1. first-person plural present active imperative of duplicō
Last modified on 17 April 2014, at 12:14