English edit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle English aren, from Old English earun, earon (are), reinforced by Old Norse plural forms in er- (displacing alternative Old English sind and bēoþ), from Proto-Germanic *arun ((they) are), from Proto-Germanic *esi/*izi (a form of Proto-Germanic *wesaną (to be)), from Proto-Indo-European *h₁ésti (is).

Cognate with Old Norse eru ((they) are) (> Icelandic eru ((they) are), Swedish äro ((they) are), Danish er ((they) are)), Old English eart ((thou) art). More at art.

Alternative forms edit

  • ar (obsolete)

Pronunciation edit

Stressed
Unstressed

Verb edit

are

  1. second-person singular simple present of be
    Mary, where are you going?
  2. first-person plural simple present of be
    We are not coming.
    • 2016, VOA Learning English (public domain)[2]:
      Here we are!
      (file)
  3. second-person plural simple present of be
    Mary and John, are you listening?
  4. third-person plural simple present of be
    They are here somewhere.
  5. (East Yorkshire, Midlands) present of be
Usage notes edit
  • The pronunciation /aʊɚ/ arising from confusion of "are" and "our" is rare, however it results as the latter can be elided into /ɑɹ/ in quick speech.
Synonyms edit
  • (second-person singular): (archaic) art (used with thou)

See also edit

other forms of verb be

Etymology 2 edit

From French are.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

are (plural ares)

  1. (rare) An accepted (but deprecated and rarely used) metric unit of area equal to 100 square metres, or a former unit of approximately the same extent. Symbol: a.
Usage notes edit
  • Are is now rarely used except in its derivative hectare.
Synonyms edit
Derived terms edit
Translations edit
Further reading edit

  Are on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Etymology 3 edit

From the phonetic similarity between our and are in many English dialects (both /ɑː(ɹ)/).

Pronunciation edit

Determiner edit

are

  1. (UK, US) Misspelling of our.
Usage notes edit

Sometimes used deliberately as a form of classist humour, as a mocking imitation of a person with little education.

References edit

  1. ^ Jespersen, Otto (1909) A Modern English Grammar on Historical Principles (Sammlung germanischer Elementar- und Handbücher; 9)‎[1], volume I: Sounds and Spellings, London: George Allen & Unwin, published 1961, § 4.432, page 130.

Anagrams edit

Basque edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Basque *arhe.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /aɾe/ [a.ɾe]
  • Rhymes: -aɾe
  • Hyphenation: a‧re

Noun edit

are inan

  1. rake

Declension edit

Dutch edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from French are, from Latin ārea.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

are f (plural aren or ares)

  1. are, a unit of surface area

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

  • Indonesian: are
  • Papiamentu: are

French edit

Etymology edit

Learned formation from Latin area, a piece of level ground. Doublet of aire.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

are m (plural ares)

  1. an are

Related terms edit

Descendants edit

  • Norwegian Bokmål: ar

Further reading edit

Indonesian edit

 
Indonesian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia id

Etymology edit

From Dutch are, from French are, from Latin ārea. Doublet of area.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): [ˈarə]
  • Hyphenation: arê

Noun edit

arê (first-person possessive areku, second-person possessive aremu, third-person possessive arenya)

  1. are: an SI unit of area equal to 100 square metres, or a former unit of approximately the same extent.

Related terms edit

Further reading edit

Italian edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Variant of aere.

Noun edit

are m (plural ari)

  1. (archaic) Alternative form of aere

Etymology 2 edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Noun edit

are f pl

  1. plural of ara

Anagrams edit

Japanese edit

Romanization edit

are

  1. Rōmaji transcription of あれ

Latin edit

Verb edit

ārē

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of āreō

References edit

Lindu edit

Noun edit

are

  1. long, large sickle

Mapudungun edit

Noun edit

are (Raguileo spelling)

  1. warmth, heat

References edit

  • Wixaleyiñ: Mapucezugun-wigkazugun pici hemvlcijka (Wixaleyiñ: Small Mapudungun-Spanish dictionary), Beretta, Marta; Cañumil, Dario; Cañumil, Tulio, 2008.

Middle English edit

Etymology 1 edit

Article edit

are

  1. genitive/dative feminine of an

Etymology 2 edit

Determiner edit

are

  1. (chiefly Kent and West Midlands) Alternative form of here (their)

Etymology 3 edit

Noun edit

are

  1. Alternative form of hare (hare)

Etymology 4 edit

Noun edit

are

  1. (Northern or Early Middle English) Alternative form of ore (honour)

Etymology 5 edit

Noun edit

are

  1. (Northern) Alternative form of ore (oar)

Etymology 6 edit

Verb edit

are

  1. Alternative form of aren

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

Etymology 1 edit

Perhaps from a Dutch Low Saxon or German Low German verb.

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Verb edit

are (present tense arar, past tense ara, past participle ara, passive infinitive arast, present participle arande, imperative are/ar)

  1. (reflexive) to suit, fit

Etymology 2 edit

Determiner edit

are

  1. (dialectal) alternative form of andre

Adjective edit

are

  1. (dialectal) alternative form of andre

Etymology 3 edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun edit

are

  1. (Can we verify(+) this sense?) white-tailed eagle

Old English edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

āre

  1. honor, glory, grace

Declension edit

Noun edit

āre

  1. dative singular of ār (messenger, herald; angel; missionary)

Old Frisian edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-West Germanic *auʀā, from Proto-Germanic *ausô.

Noun edit

are n

  1. ear

Inflection edit

Declension of āre

(neuter n-stem)

singular plural
nominative āre ārene, ārne
genitive āra ārana, ārena
dative āra ārum, ārem
ārenum, ārenem
accusative āre ārene, ārne

Descendants edit

  • North Frisian:
    Föhr: uar
    Hallig, Mooring: uur
    Helgoland: Uaar
  • Saterland Frisian: Oor
  • West Frisian: ear

Pali edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

Onomatopoeic.

Interjection edit

are

  1. wow, whoa
  2. yay

Derived terms edit

Portuguese edit

Pronunciation edit

 

  • Rhymes: (Brazil) -aɾi, (Portugal) -aɾɨ
  • Hyphenation: a‧re

Etymology 1 edit

Noun edit

are m (plural ares)

  1. (historical) are (unit of area)

Etymology 2 edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb edit

are

  1. inflection of arar:
    1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular imperative

Romanian edit

Etymology edit

Cf. Latin habēret, habuerit. Compare Aromanian ari. See also Romanian ar, used in a periphrastic construction of the conditional.

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

are

  1. third-person singular present indicative of avea

See also edit

Scots edit

Etymology edit

From Middle English are, from Old English ār (honor, worth, dignity), from Proto-West Germanic *aiʀu, from Proto-Germanic *aizō (respect, honour), from *ais- (to honour, respect, revere).

Cognate with Dutch eer (honour, credit), German Ehre (honour, glory), Latin erus (master, professor).

Noun edit

are (uncountable)

  1. (obsolete) grace; mercy

Spanish edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈaɾe/ [ˈa.ɾe]
  • Rhymes: -aɾe
  • Syllabification: a‧re

Verb edit

are

  1. inflection of arar:
    1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular imperative

Tagalog edit

Pronunciation edit

  • Hyphenation: a‧re
  • IPA(key): /ʔaˈɾe/, [ʔɐˈɾɛ]

Pronoun edit

aré (Baybayin spelling ᜀᜇᜒ) (chiefly Batangas, Mindoro, Marinduque)

  1. Alternative form of ari: this one; this
    Synonyms: (Manila) ito, (Central Luzon) ire, (Central Luzon) ere
    Ano ga are?What is this?

See also edit

Tangam edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Tani *a-lə, from Proto-Sino-Tibetan *la.

Noun edit

are

  1. (anatomy) foot, leg

References edit

  • Mark W. Post (2017) The Tangam Language: Grammar, Lexicon and Texts, →ISBN

Ternate edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

are

  1. (transitive) to scratch

Conjugation edit

Conjugation of are
Singular Plural
Inclusive Exclusive
1st toare foare miare
2nd noare niare
3rd Masculine oare iare, yoare
Feminine moare
Neuter iare
- archaic

References edit

  • Rika Hayami-Allen (2001) A descriptive study of the language of Ternate, the northern Moluccas, Indonesia, University of Pittsburgh

Toraja-Sa'dan edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *qazay.

Noun edit

are

  1. ant

Venetian edit

Noun edit

are

  1. plural of ara

Wolof edit

Noun edit

are (definite form are bi)

  1. stop, especially a bus stop

Yilan Creole edit

Etymology edit

From Japanese あれ (are, that).

Pronoun edit

are

  1. third person singular pronoun
  2. that (person or object)

Synonyms edit

  • (third person singular pronoun): (Hanhsi) zibun, zin

Coordinate terms edit

Derived terms edit

References edit

  • Chien Yuehchen (2015), “The lexical system of Yilan Creole”, in New Advances in Formosan Linguistics[3], pages 513-532
  • Chien Yuehchen (2018), “日本語を上層とする 宜蘭クレオールの人称代名詞”, in 日本語の研究[4], volume 14, issue 4
  • Chien Yuehchen (2019), “日本語を上層とする 宜蘭クレオールの指示詞”, in 社会言語科学 [The Japanese Journal of Language in Society][5], volume 21, issue 2, pages 50-65

Yoruba edit

Etymology 1 edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

àre

  1. vindication, justification; justice
  2. excuse, pardon
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

From the same root as eré, iré, and uré, see Proto-Yoruba *V-ré

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

aré

  1. Alternative form of eré (running, race)
  2. Alternative form of eré (speed)
  3. Alternative form of eré (play, pastime)

Etymology 3 edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

àre

  1. miserableness; the state of being miserable and aimless
Derived terms edit