ChoctawEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Cognate with Chickasaw pi-

PrefixEdit

pi- (class II first-person paucal)

  1. the direct object of an active transitive verb
    us (few)
  2. the subject of a stative intransitive verb
    we (few)
  3. indicates possession of a noun
    our (we few's)
Usage notesEdit

Class II person markers are used for possession only for a small set of words, mostly including kinship terms and body parts.

Etymology 2Edit

From pi- +‎ i- (he, she, it; him, her, it; his, her, its).

PrefixEdit

pi- (before vowels pim-, class III first-person paucal)

  1. the indirect object of an active transitive verb
    to us (few), for us (few)
  2. the subject of an intransitive affective verb
    we (few)
  3. the direct object of a small set of transitive verbs mostly dealing with affect, communication and intimacy
    us (few)
  4. indicates possession of a noun
    our (we few's)
InflectionEdit

CurripacoEdit

PrefixEdit

pi-

  1. second person singular agent marker

ReferencesEdit

  • Swintha Danielsen, Tania Granadillo, Agreement in two Arawak languages, in The Typology of Semantic Alignment (edited by Mark Donohue, Søren Wichmann) (2008, →ISBN, page 398

OjibweEdit

PreverbEdit

pi-

  1. Alternative form of bi- (when not in word initial position)
    Gaawiin ganage gii-pi-izhaasiin.
    He really didn't come.

TaosEdit

PronunciationEdit

PrefixEdit

pi-

  1. (transitive) first-person singular subject + third-person inverse number object

PrefixEdit

pi-

  1. (formative) inverse number object prefix (on verbs with plural subjects) (compare the pę- allomorph)

Alternative formsEdit

Derived termsEdit


Tocharian BEdit

VerbEdit

pi-

  1. to sing